Mayfield Curriculum 

Students follow a broad and balanced, curriculum that will prepare them for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of adult life.  This is delivered through a well-considered curriculum and an extensive range of enrichment opportunities.

If you wish to find out more about our curriculum, please email [email protected] 

 

 

 

Our mission is to provide our pupils with: 

Outstanding academic standards, with a particular focus on acquiring a foreign language, developing competency as a musician and performer, as well as encouraging sporting prowess - all in a timely fashion; 

Outstanding pastoral care based on nurturing each individual's self-esteem and ambition to realise their full potential; 

Outstanding opportunities to develop the 6Rs (resilience, responsibility, respect, resourcefulness, ready and reflective) and ‘character’ experiences to succeed both at school and prepare them for being a well-equipped member of society and ready for the world of work.” 

‘Your Only Limitation Is Your Ambition’

We believe that students should have the ability to succeed in education and the wider world regardless of their background or ability.

The 6 R’s

Our learning across all subjects is underpinned by The 6 R’s. These are the values, skills and qualities that will help our pupils to succeed as they move through the school. These values have been taught to our Primary school under the title Learning Superpowers. We continue to celebrate our pupil's development of these values, skills and qualities into the Senior School. In particular, we focus on how developing these qualities helps to aid independent learning for life and exam success.

We want our children to be:

Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development (SMSC)

All staff are responsible for teaching SMSC. Here are some examples of how teachers may incorporate SMSC into pupils lessons:

Spiritual Development

* How beliefs inform their perspective on life and interest in and respect for different people’s feelings and values;

* Sense of enjoyment and fascination in learning about themselves and others;

* Use of imagination and creativity in their learning e.g. use of role play, presentations;

* Being prepared to reflect on their experiences e.g. self- assessment

Moral Development

* Able to recognise the difference between right and wrong;

* Understand the consequences of their actions;

* Interest in investigating and giving reasoned views about moral and ethical issues.

Social Development

* Using a range of social skills in a variety of contexts including working with pupils from different backgrounds to their own e.g. organisation of groups, seating plans;

* Willing to participate in a variety of social settings, cooperating well with others and resolving conflict successfully e.g. group work;

* Interest in and understanding of the way communities and societies work at a variety of levels e.g. learning about another culture, religious beliefs and the way they affect how people live.

Cultural Development

* Understand the wide range of cultural issues that have shaped their heritage;

* Willing to participate in a variety of opportunities e.g. artistic, sporting, mathematical, technological, scientific and cultural e.g. extra-curricular activities, joining in different activities in lessons;

* Interested in exploring, understanding and showing respect for cultural diversity. This is shown in attitudes to different groups in society at a variety of levels e.g. how they mix in social time.

British Values

As well as opportunities to develop SMSC in lessons, pupils also extensively experience the key British values of ‘democracy’, ‘individual liberty’, ‘mutual respect’, ‘tolerance of others faiths and beliefs’ and the ‘rule of law’ as part of our pastoral programme (assemblies, tutor programme and themes of the week).

As part of these sessions, pupils are given an opportunity to learn how these values shape our society and to discuss and reflect upon how they contribute to a positive community for all.

Mayfield Curriculum 

Students follow a broad and balanced, curriculum that will prepare them for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of adult life.  This is delivered through a well-considered curriculum and an extensive range of enrichment opportunities.

The Secondary Curriculum

The subjects studied at Mayfield School change as pupils progress through the year groups.  The Subject Allocation table shown below shows the subjects available for study in each year group and the lessons allocated. 

Subject

2020-2021 Number of lessons allocated per fortnight per year group

7

8

9

10

11

English

7

7

7

8

9

Maths

7

7

7

7

8

Science

7

7

7

9

9

PE

4

4

4

4

4

AR

2

2

2

 

 

Religious Education (RE)

2

2

2

 

 

Personal, Social Education (PSE)

1

1

1

 

 

Citizenship, Philosophy and Religion (CPR)

 

 

 

2

2

Computing

3

3

3

 

 

History

3

3

3

 

 

Geography

3

3

3

 

 

Technology

2

2

2

 

 

Spanish

3

3

3

 

 

Art

2

2

2

 

 

Drama

2

2

2

 

 

Dance

1

1

1

 

 

Music

1

1

1

 

 

Option 1

 

 

 

5

6

Option 2

 

 

 

5

6

Option 3

 

 

 

5

6

Option 4       5 0

 

Students in Years 7, 8 and 9 follow a curriculum with time allocated shown in the curriculum allocation table.

As part of the Mayfield School Literacy Strategy, all Year 7 and 8 pupils begin the day with a thirty-minute lesson called Resilience, allotted for reading and literacy skills.  Twice a fortnight, pupils attend Accelerated Reader lessons to encourage children to read widely and often.

All Year 7 pupils learn Spanish as their foreign language.

In Year 10 the subjects studied change; RE and PSE is replaced with CPR and pupils continue with English, Maths, PE and Science. In addition to these subjects, pupils select four option subjects.

We fully support our pupils through the options process. They receive a series of assemblies, from subject specialists, as well as guidance from the pastoral team. In the Spring term, there is a Parents Evening to support the decision-making process.

The options available are:

GCSE: Art, Business Studies, Computing, Dance, Drama, French, Geography, History, Photography and Spanish.

BTEC: Music, Digital Information Technology, Performing Arts and Travel and Tourism.

For a detailed summary of course content for each subject option subject please refer to the option booklets listed below.

 

Curriculum Information

 

Our mission in English in EYFS, KS1 and KS2 is for: 

Children to be fluent readers, who demonstrate a sound understanding of the literature they read. They will be encouraged to develop a positive reading habit through exposure to a wide range of literature and inviting reading environments. Our pupils will write for a range of purposes, using rich language and vocabulary, acquired through listening, speaking and debate. Their writing will demonstrate accuracy and will include a range of linguistic and grammatical features, which are demonstrated through a range of genres, including poetry, fiction and non-fiction. 

The National Curriculum (2013) states that, “The overarching aim for English is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment.”  

At Mayfield, we believe that English underpins all areas of the curriculum and that every child deserves to articulate with precision, have the ability to express their ideas freely and imaginatively, read for both information gathering and pleasure, but most importantly enjoy the creativity that English language and literature provide.  

All English lessons across Primary encompass our 6 R’s (Responsible, Respectful, Ready, Reflective, Resilient and Resourceful), which encourages and prepares our pupils to become life-long learners. 

Reading 

In primary, children begin their reading journey, by learning phonics from a synthetic, systematic phonics programme. Alongside phonics, children participate in prosody sessions, which are teacher led and focus on fluency and reading with expression and intonation. In addition to decoding and word reading, the children practise their comprehension skills, using fully decodable texts. We believe that when children can decode fluently, their understanding of the text will improve.  

Reading at Mayfield is also valued and incorporated through our core English text used within writing sessions. Opportunities to practice oral and written comprehension skills are integrated into English lessons and revisited through 1:1 reading sessions.  

To develop a love for reading across our school, we spend time each day sharing a class reader. These are carefully selected and are often chosen and voted for by the children. 

Writing 

Writing journeys are planned around core, age-appropriate texts, which link to year group topics. Spelling, Reading, and Writing are incorporated into main English sessions and all areas of the English curriculum are taught in context to the book.  

Writing opportunities are also filtered into topic lessons, so that the children are given the chance to apply their skills in a cross-curricular approach.  

Spelling 

In addition to learning new spelling rules through core English texts, children are given sets of spellings to learn, which are formed using year group common exception words. Opportunities are provided throughout the school week, for children to rehearse and practise these by using a range of memorable and multisensory approaches.  

Our overall aim in EYFS, KS1 and KS2 is to prepare our students for their transition to the next stage of their learning journey. Outstanding standards, confidence in their own ability and an overall ownership of their continued learning is what we aim for in our pupils’ educational trajectory. 

Our mission in English at KS3 and KS4 is to provide our pupils with: 

A passion for literature that encompasses the broad range of literary heritage in poetry, drama and prose texts-woven through our wide-ranging and challenging curriculum from KS3 to KS4. Our aim is to enrich our students in their cultural knowledge, context and experience to inspire further exploration and study beyond KS4 and facilitate their ambitions for college, work and future careers. 

Through our overarching topics for KS3 we take our students on a journey through the great British cannon of culturally celebrated writers and poets from the past to the present; Shelley to Zephania, Dickens to Collins, Shakespeare to Russell. Students focus in on a range of genres including, gothic literary traditions, dystopian fiction, science-fiction, Romanticism, world poetry, war poetry, modern classics and a range of Shakespeare’s plays and sonnets. 

Reaching into world literature our students weave through widely renowned world fiction, short stories and internationally acclaimed poets, providing our students with a broad perspective of Literature and a global view. 

Beyond their knowledge of Literature, we aim to inspire our learners through a love of language in reading, writing and speaking. Through our varied English curriculum, we also expect rigorous technical accuracy in spelling punctuation and grammar building on prior learning and specifically linked to tier two and three vocabulary achieved through expert teaching, feedback, independent learning and intervention. We want resilient students, able to develop and apply their critical thinking skills as they are exposed to a range of skilful non-fiction writing; speech- writing, persuasive presentations, articles and research from the 19th century to the present day. In building on their decoding of texts at KS3, by KS4 students develop their own critical skills, informing their own craft in reading, writing and speaking, embedding skills needed for GCSE, college and equipped for the world of work. 

English is the gateway to all other subjects and future success and the knowledge and skills our students develop on their journey through KS3 and KS4 embed the resilience, reflective skills and resourcefulness required for outstanding learners, leaders and thinkers. 

Year 1 Word Reading 

In Year 1 pupils continue to learn phonics using a synthetic, systematic programme - ‘Letters and Sounds.’ The pupils are taught to apply their phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words, so that they can accurately segment and blend unfamiliar language when reading. By the end of Y1, children are expected to recognise and read a prescribed set of common exception words as well as read words that contain a range of suffixes, including –s, –es, –ing, –ed, –er and –est. Pupils rehearse these skills, using fully decodable texts that match our phonics programme and each child’s phonic ability. When reading aloud, children are expected to read words containing more than one syllable and decode words with contractions, whilst recognising that the apostrophe omits letters. All these skills are practised within prosody sessions, where the children spend time reading and re-reading texts to develop their fluency and expression. 

Year 1 Reading Comprehension 

At Mayfield we promote a love and passion for reading by listening to, discussing and sharing a wide range of literature, including poems, stories and non-fiction. The texts studied and shared with the pupils are carefully handpicked to ensure they are age appropriate, language rich and at a level beyond that at which they can read independently. 

At Mayfield, pupils are exposed to a myriad of opportunities to read and share books throughout the school day. In all book-related sessions, pupils are encouraged to link what they read or hear read to their own experiences. They become familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales, as well as learning to appreciate rhymes and poems.  

Key skills mastered in Y1 comprehension lessons at Mayfield include – retelling familiar stories, recognising predictable phrases, making inferences, discussing the meaning of new vocabulary and making inferences based on what they read. 

Year 1 Spelling  

In Year 1, the pupils are encouraged to apply their phonics skills when writing and spelling words. They are expected to draw upon phonemes taught and use word mats to help them make the correct phoneme/grapheme correspondence choices. 

In addition to phonic application in spelling, pupils are expected to spell a set of Y1 common exception words. Rehearsing the days of the week, along with the letters of the alphabet, is a crucial element of Y1 writing foundations. 

In the Spring term, pupils learn phase 5 of the ‘Letters and Sounds’ phonics programme, which promotes the written application of words and drawing upon phoneme/grapheme correspondences. 

In Y1, pupils are exposed to the terms prefix and suffix. They learn these within spelling and grammar lessons and apply taught rules, when using them in their own writing. As well as suffixes, the pupils are taught plural spelling rules and the third person singular marker for verbs. These skills are often applied within dictated sentences, enabling teaching staff to observe whether taught spelling and grammar rules are embedded. 

Year 1 Handwriting 

Developing core muscle strength and mastering pre-writing skills, such as shape formation is fundamental before being taught to sit correctly at a table to hold a pencil comfortably and correctly. Once children have secured these skills, they can begin to form lower-case letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in the right place, form capital letters and form digits 0-9 correctly.  

Year 1 Writing Composition 

At Mayfield, pupils in Y1 are actively encouraged to orally rehearse their ideas by saying out loud what they are going to write about. Oracy aids pupils in sequencing sentences, so that they can form coherent written sentences. Being reflective is one of our 6 R’s - we train our pupils to become independent and reflective learners, making sure they re-read what they have written to check it is clear and makes sense. Planned opportunities for our pupils to discuss and share their writing with the teacher and their peers is something that happens in every classroom across the school daily. 

Year 1 Writing – Vocabulary, Punctuation and Grammar 

Pupils in Y1 are expected to leave space between words as well as join words and using the coordinating conjunction and. In addition to this, pupils focus on using capital letters correctly. They learn how capital letters start sentences, are used for names of people, places, the days of the week, and the personal pronoun ‘I.’ End stops, including full-stops, question marks and exclamation marks are also taught in Y1, so that pupils can accurately punctuate sentences. 

Year 2 Word Reading 

Y2 pupils are expected to continue applying their phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words until automatic decoding has become embedded and reading is fluent. Y2 mirror Y1 with their expectation that accurate reading is achieved by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes taught so far, especially recognising alternative sounds for graphemes. 

Y2 pupils are also expected to read words of two or more syllables and read words containing common suffixes. Pupils at the end of KS1 are given further common exception words to recognise and read, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word. 

In prosody and whole class reading sessions, pupils are taught and encouraged to read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered. 

Y2 pupils are too given fully decodable reading books that are closely matched to their improving phonic knowledge, so that they can sound out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation. 

Year 2 Reading Comprehension 

Book talk in Y2 consists of listening to, discussing and expressing views about a wide range of contemporary and classic poetry, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently. Naturally, when reading and talking about books, pupils discuss the sequence of events and how items of information are related. At Mayfield, pupils in Y2 study non-fiction books, developing an understanding of structure and non-fiction features. 

As well as recognising simple recurring literary language in stories/poetry and discussing the meanings of words, pupils share their favourite words and phrases encountered in the literature they read. 

Within poetry units in English, pupils in Y2 are provided with opportunities to build up a repertoire of poems that they learn by heart. Poetry planning incorporates the recital of poems with a focus on appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear. 

Pupils at Mayfield are encouraged to link what they read to other literature they have experienced. Drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher is imperative in building a comprehensive knowledge of different literature. In addition to this, pupils learn to develop their knowledge of inferences based on what is being said and done and are taught to ask and answer questions, using the VIPERS skills (Vocabulary, Inference, Prediction, Explanation, Retrieval and Summarise).  

Year 2 Spelling  

At Mayfield, pupils are taught to segment words into phonemes and represent these using correct graphemes. Phase 5 of our phonics programme focuses on different ways of spelling different sounds. Each classroom contains sound mats and grapheme grids that pupils are encouraged to use when spelling unfamiliar words. The pupils are taught to locate the sound and then look for the correct grapheme. Methods such as writing the word with each grapheme are highly encouraged, as it allows pupils to sightsee if it is correct or not. 

Each year group has an individual set of common exception words that they are expected to learn and spell. Multi-sensory approaches are used at Mayfield to help the children learn these.  

 

In addition to common exception words, Y2 pupils are taught how to spell contracted words along with words containing a range of suffixes (-ment, -ness, -full, -less, -ly). These are taught in context to the main English text, which allows pupils to practise, apply and retain key spelling rules. 

Year 2 Handwriting 

Pupils in Y2 are taught to form lower-case letters of the correct size relative to one another and write capital letters and digits of the correct size in relation to lower-case letters. Cursive handwriting (using diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join letters) is reinforced in Y2 after following a comprehensive handwriting programme in Y1. 

Year 2 Writing Composition 

At Mayfield composition skills are taught through topic based, age-appropriate texts. Pupils write for a range of purposes, including narratives about personal experiences, real events and poetry. They are taught how to plan and map out their ideas, before embarking on their writing journey. Evaluating and improving writing is an important skill that is taught in Y2. Pupils are expected to be reflective learners by making sure they re-read their work to check spelling and grammatical accuracy.  

Year 2 Writing – Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation 

In Y2, pupils begin to develop their understanding of punctuation by learning how to use commas and apostrophes in addition to capital letters and full stops. Opportunities to apply these skills are carefully planned into English units throughout the academic year. Pupils are taught about different sentences using different forms: statement, question, exclamation, command – these are applied to a range of writing genres, including instructional writing, non-chronological reports and narratives. Other grammar skills taught in Y2 include expanded noun phrases, past/present tense and coordinating/subordinating conjunctions. Again, these are taught in context and applied to a range of different writing genres. 

Years 3 & 4 Word Reading 

Pupils begin to explore the origin of words through etymology and morphology. They investigate root words and develop their understanding of different prefixes/suffixes, while identifying how they change the meaning of words. 

Year 3 & 4 Reading Comprehension 

Pupils in lower KS2 continue to listen to and discuss a wide range of literature, including different forms of poetry, so that they expand and broaden their knowledge of different literary genres. In Years 3 & 4, pupils deepen their understanding of books and how they are structured. They are taught to read for a range of purposes, so that they can draw upon this within their own writing. At Mayfield, the curriculum is planned, so that the reading feeds directly into the pupils’ writing. 

Pupils are taught to become reflective learners at Mayfield with encouragement to explain what they have read and demonstrate their understanding by retelling and identifying main ideas through detailed summaries. The six elements of reading which include vocabulary, inference, prediction, explanation, retrieval and summary are taught explicitly in KS2, making sure they build upon prior learning obtained from KS1. The skills taught in KS1 are built upon in lower KS2 by exploring how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning. Pupils are also expected to identify different themes and conventions in a wide range of books.  

Year 3 & 4 Spelling  

Pupils in lower KS2 begin to explore further prefixes/suffixes and are taught how to add them in context to the main English text. Pupils are also exposed to further homophones, which build on the foundations set at the end of KS1. Having learnt how to use a possessive apostrophe for singular nouns in KS1, pupils in lower KS2 begin to place the possessive apostrophe accurately in words with regular plurals and in words with irregular plurals. In Years 3 & 4, pupils are taught how to use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary, which allows our pupils to be reflective and independent learners. 

Year 3 & 4 Handwriting 

Pupils continue to join letters cursively when they enter KS2 with a focus on increasing the legibility, consistency and quality of their handwriting. 

Year 3 & 4 Writing Composition 

At Mayfield, discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar is a vital ingredient to achieve a successful writing outcome. Pupils are encouraged to orally rehearse and discuss ideas before recording them. Developing and expanding vocabulary is a key focus in lower KS2, along with understanding how to use an increasing range of sentence structures effectively. 

Through topic-based texts, pupils are taught how to create settings, characters and plot as well as use simple organisational devices in non-fiction-based writing. While writing narratives and non-fiction outcomes, pupils are shown how to organise their ideas into paragraphs, so that their sentences link around a theme. 

Pupils in lower KS2 continue to be reflective learners by assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing. Proof reading, editing and proposing changes are skills that are embedded in the writing process here at Mayfield. This also applies to oracy – pupils are given a myriad of opportunities to read their work aloud, so that they can develop their reading with intonation skills. 

Year 3 & 4 Writing – Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation 

Pupils in lower KS2 further develop their understanding of subordination by learning to extend a range of sentences with more than one clause, using a wider range of conjunctions than previously taught at the end of KS1. Pupils also continue to focus on writing coherent pieces of work, by ensuring they choose nouns or pronouns appropriately. Other grammar skills taught in Years 3 &4 include adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause, along with punctuating direct speech and using fronted adverbials to vary sentence starters. All these skills are explicitly taught in context through topic-based, age-appropriate texts. 

Year 5 & 6 Word Reading 

Pupils in upper KS2 continue to explore the origin of words through etymology and morphology, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that they meet. 

Year 5- & 6-Word Comprehension 

At Mayfield, it is imperative that pupils continue to build up a repertoire of an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks year on year, so that they can draw upon these experiences to strengthen their understanding of the world and their own writing. Pupils in Years 5 & 6 are expected to continue reading books that are structured in different ways and for a range of purposes. This allows our pupils to become confident with the skills needed to write for different audiences and purposes. 

In upper KS2, pupils are encouraged to increase their familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends, traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions. While providing opportunities to read for pleasure is very important, it is also imperative that pupils are given time to recommend books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices. 

The progression of skills from lower KS2 to upper KS2 comes with the ability to make comparisons within and across books that they have read, which is why developing a bank of literature and knowledge of different text genres is important at this stage of our pupils’ education. 

In Years 5 & 6 pupils learn a wider range of poetry by heart and spend time preparing poems and plays to read aloud, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear. 

Our pupils remain resilient when checking books make sense to them by discussing their understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context. They also further develop the six key VIPERS skills by drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence. Progression in prediction skills is evidenced in upper KS2 by pupils making predictions from details stated and implied. This also applies to summarising whereby pupils are expected to identify key details that support the main ideas. 

Pupils in Years 5 & 6 are too expected to identify how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning and in addition to this, they are shown how to discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader. Obtaining a sound understanding of why and how language is used and manipulated in different texts allows pupils to mirror this in their own work. Another skill taught in upper KS2 is distinguishing between statements of fact and opinion, along with retrieving, recording and presenting information from non-fiction. 

Pupils in Years 5 & 6 are encouraged to participate in discussions about what they have read, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views. At Mayfield, pupils are given opportunities to debate and provide reasoned justifications for their views. 

Year 5 & 6 Spelling  

Pupils are encouraged to use their understanding of morphology and etymology to help them learn how to spell unfamiliar words, understanding that some words need to be learnt specifically. In upper KS2, pupils continue to develop their knowledge and understanding of further prefixes, suffixes and homophones. They are taught to spell words with silent letters in context to carefully chosen topic-based texts along with securing an understanding of how to use dictionaries and thesauruses effectively.  

Year 5 & 6 Handwriting and presentation 

Pupils are expected to apply previously taught skills so that they can write legibly, fluently and at increasing speed. By the end of KS2, pupils are encouraged to independently choose which shape of a letter to use when given choices and to decide whether to join specific letters. 

Year 5 & 6 Writing Composition 

In Years 5 & 6, pupils identify the audience and purpose of writing, which allows them to recognise the features required for their own writing. Pupils are encouraged to draw upon reading and research, so that they can expand and develop initial ideas. They do this by considering how authors have developed characters, settings and plots in literature they have previously read, listened to or seen performed. This also applies when creating atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance action. At Mayfield, we pride ourselves on allowing our pupils the time needed to read and research how existing authors apply these skills, so that they can master this effectively in their own outcomes. 

When writing their own outcomes, pupils in upper KS2 are expected to select appropriate grammar and vocabulary to demonstrate how these choices can change and enhance meaning. Pupils in upper KS2 also develop their use of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs they write as well as using further organisational and presentational devices to structure text. 

Pupils continue to assess the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing in upper KS2, by proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning. Proof-reading toolkits include checking consistent use of tense and ensuring correct  

 subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural, distinguishing between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register. 

Year 5 & 6 Word – Vocabulary, Punctuation and Grammar 

Pupils in upper KS2 are taught to recognise vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing, including subjunctive forms. They use passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence and use the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause. All these grammar skills are taught in context through topic-based, age-appropriate texts.  

Pupils are taught a range of advanced punctuation at the end of KS2, which includes commas to clarify meaning, hyphens, brackets, dashes, semi-colons, colons, and commas to indicate parenthesis. In addition to this, pupils are expected to use modal verbs and adverbs as well as relative clauses, showcasing acquired skills acquired to use a wide range of sentence structures within their writing. 

In the English dept at Mayfield, the three core key skill areas of Reading, Writing and Speaking and Listening are delivered through six units that pupils engage with each year from 7-9.  Each of these units uses a variety of increasingly complex and difficult texts and resourcing to build and spiral key skills from the start of KS3 until the end and prepare pupils for the rigours of GCSE in KS4.  

Monsters and Men 

Starting in year 7, pupils engage with extracts from Bram Stoker’s Dracula and employ the initial skills of analysis of implicit and explicit understanding and synthesising of information from a text to form a response.  Gothic fiction is used as a stimulus to engage pupils to write experiment with different forms and conventions of persuasive writing such as newspapers, which are key to the GCSE.   

Moving into Year 8, pupils are given a wider variety of canonical/ historical texts to engage with from the choice of: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll, Jekyll and Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, War of the Worlds by HG Wells, and Animal Farm by George Orwell. This will enable them to further their experiences of challenging pre-1914 texts and extend/ expand their vocabulary base through revisiting structural and authorial intentions and building on the work done in year 7 by extending the knowledge and use of Subject Specific terminology to infer and interpret implicit and explicit information and analyse structural form and characterisation through authorial choices.  Fiction extracts and examples are used as stimulus to encourage pupils to write creatively in and expand vocabulary and structural choices, as well as authorial intent and exposition through their creative choices. 

In year 9, pupils continue their journey through the darker side of literary fiction by studying (in full) novels from a choice of: Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck, Lord of the Flies by William Golding, 1984 by George Orwell; building on the work from previous years and introducing the appreciation and inclusion of historical and contextual understanding of the texts studied into pupil’s analytical writing.  Texts are used to build on creative concepts such as characterisation and structural conventions through the use of vocabulary and linguistic device choices. 

Heroes and Villains 

In year 7, pupils use a variety of extracts from classical and historical Hero texts such as Beowulf, Hercules, Homer’s Odyssey, in order to introduce and build the skills of comparison of textual/ authorial viewpoints and vocabulary/ linguistic device choice, and the representation of character.  Pupils use this understanding and knowledge in their creative writing to craft and represent their own heroic creations as defined by their own authorial choices and employ their understanding of structuring and building a text throughout various phases to create a reliable and realistic/ believable narrative for the reader. 

Moving into year 8, pupils look at a choice of texts from Holes by Louis Sachar, and The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle, and build on their understanding of characterisation and structural choices/ authorial intent through choices in vocabulary and linguistic device, whilst returning to and building on their understanding of Subject Specific Terminology and the effect it has on the reader.  In terms of assessment, pupils begin to look at exam board style phrasing in this unit as an introduction to the length, content and quantity of writing response required at GCSE.  Using the writing style of the chosen texts, pupils continue to develop their own narrative style and experiment with epistolary forms, more complex punctuation and personal tone in genres such as diary, letter etc, both of which are GSCE related persuasive styles.   

In year 9, pupils experience Dystopian Fiction forms through The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins and building on/ across from the study of 1984 by George Orwell or new texts such as Brave New World by Aldous Huxley.  Pupils build and compliment their understanding of the skills of analysis of implicit/ explicit detail and analysis of the narrative voice, as well as comparative elements across texts.  In their creative writing, pupils experience the GCSE style approach of writing for a specific frame of reference through the short story task: “The Assassin” which uses the previous learning of Dystopian Fiction and imagery as a stimulus to recreate a GCSE Language Paper 1 Question 5 style assessment where pupils can practice exam style timing and preparation.  

Power and Conflict 

Pupils begin this unit in year 7 by looking at prominent and historically significant speeches such as MLK’s I have a Dream and JFK’s Inaugural address, looking at persuasive style and forms of address, using Subject Specific terminology for persuasive writing, as well as how time, place and context can affect content.  Pupils use their understanding of persuasive techniques to create their own persuasive writing, ensuring that they employ their understanding of how to structure an argument using appropriate paragraphs and discourse markers, in line with GCSE Language Paper 2 Question 5. 

Pupils then move on to the study of playscripts, looking at the theatrical version of War Horse and WW1 poetry as an early introduction to Literature Paper 2.  Pupils understand and analyse the writer’s craft, language, structure and staging of the play with appropriate Subject Specific Terminology and incorporating skills of analysis of implicit and explicit meaning with some comparison through poetry-based work.  Textual stimulus materials are used to create a piece of persuasive writing in letter format, in line with GCSE Literature Paper 2 Question 5 style and using authentic narrative voice and perspective. 

Moving into year 9, pupils continue playscript study with Blood Brothers by Willy Russell, studying the whole text and building upon the skills from previous years but layering on GCSE style approaches to Lit Paper 2 assessment in their extended analytical writing task.  Pupils explore genre further and incorporate cultural and historical/ contextual understanding into their writing, and further extend their understanding of Subject Specific Terminology to further analyse and explain.  Pupils then engage in GCSE Language Paper 2 style persuasive writing in an article style and in response to a critical statement as stimulus, using their understanding of authorial perspective, audience, structure and vocabulary/ linguistic choices they have built up to this point. 

Love Shakespeare 

Pupils begin this unit in year 7 by learning more about the historical and cultural significance of the life and times of Shakespeare, as this is often one of the more difficult aspects of it to grasp initially.  Pupils work with a variety of examples from well-known Shakespearean texts so pupils can learn and appreciate the variety and complexity, but accessibility of the language, as this is also one of the most difficult aspects of studying it.  Pupils learn and employ Subject Specific Terminology specific to playscripts previously learned in the study of War Horse, as well as additional understanding of more complex terms specific to Shakespeare in order to analyse and interpret meaning and intent.  Textual examples and experiences are used to stimulate a piece of narrative perspective creative writing focussing on the use of senses and specific planning to incorporate emotive and powerful vocabulary on a specific scene. 

Pupils then move on to studying more focussed and specific Shakespearean textual extracts from a choice of The Merchant of Venice, Richard III, The Tempest, MSND, The Tempest and The Merchant of Venice in more of their entirety. This helps them to build on the previous learning of Shakespeare/ playscripts and to further develop their understanding of writer’s perspective and choices on the audience, language and device choices, and structural choices in the texts, combined with a greater appreciation of context and leading to a more focussed assessment in a GCSE Literature Paper 1 style. Finally, pupils engage in creative writing in monologue/ soliloquy, to further enhance pupil understanding of how Shakespeare creates characters and uses language to influence and affect the audience. 

In year Nine Pupils engage with Macbeth and bring all their skills previously learned to analyse and understand implicitly and explicitly at extract and structural level.  Pupils build on previous units in year 9 by extending their understanding of essay writing skills in terms of length and specific content, formal approaches and tone in line with GCSE Literature Paper 1 expectations, culminating in a GCSE style assessment and further work on producing Shakespearean monologue/ soliloquy to extend understanding of GCSE Paper 1 style perspective creative writing and focussing on a specific viewpoint. 

Time Travellers and the origins of language 

Pupils begin this unit looking at historical and contemporary Ballads and extending their understanding of the ways historical and contextual factors can influence literature, whilst extending their skills of analysis and inference of implicit and explicit meaning, and their appreciation of structure and form, plus the associated conventions and Subject Specific Terminology.  This is used as a stimulus for further creative writing and collaborative group work with performance of pupil’s own Ballads and poetry, in order to further appreciate the stylistic conventions and historical significance of the form. 

In year 8, pupils are exposed to a range of Science fiction and non-fiction and non-fiction articles and extracts, in order to further their understanding of GCSE Language Paper 2 analysis and comprehension skills, as well as the skill of comparison using linguistic and structural authorial choices and decisions. This links closely to STEM and offers effective cross-curricular links for pupils to engage with.  Following this, pupils build on their own understanding of structural organisation and non-fiction language choices and conventions to produce their own piece of persuasive/ informative text on a Science based topic of their choice 

Moving int year 9, pupils continue the Science/ Dystopian Fiction/ themed approach and are exposed to more complex texts and extracts from classic historical and contemporary works such as The Time Machine by HG Wells, Gulliver’s Travels by Robert Louis Stevenson, The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham, The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood, and The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams.  Using the GCSE Literature Paper 1 as a basis, pupils build on their existing knowledge of extended writing/ tone/ formality and structured approaches to tackling more complex texts, combining this with the work already done on language analysis and contextual referencing.  This leads to GCSE Paper 1 Question 5 style creative writing, where pupils – again – combine their experiences of planning, drafting and structured approaches to writing, to produce their own descriptive pieces of writing, using a stimulus image/ statement. 

Our World 

Pupils begin this unit in year 7 by looking at Poetry from different cultures and using their skills of analysis and comparison to look at the differing ways writers use theme/ word/ imagery/ structure to convey their message and influence the reader, including the differing Subject Specific Terminology associated with the poetry genre.  Rather than have this lead to writing their own poetry, pupils learn to effectively and efficiently annotate and make notes on and around poems, in line with GCSE expectations in preparation for Literature Paper 2.  

In year 8, pupils continue the skills of comparison by working with short stories from British and other cultures in much the same way that they are expected to for GCSE Language Paper 1.  This includes analysing language and the management and use of micro-quotations within structured paragraphs, and building on terminology already introduced in previous units, and leading to creative writing from a solo narrative perspective to replicate the stylistic conventions of the extracts/ stories they have been studying. 

In year 9, we continue along this theme, looking again at British/ other culture, short stories, focussing on how contextual factors influence our own writing and how we can inform and influence the reader of this in our own structural, linguistic and grammatical choices, with a focus on comparing these aspects in our analysis.  This leads to a piece of written work on an area of British culture in a creative/ non-fiction style, at the choice of the pupils, and building on all previous work in this area and relating to GCSE Language Paper 1 and 2/ Questions 5. 

At the end of year 9, pupils have their first introduction to the English Literature GCSE course when they begin their study of An Inspector Calls by JB Priestley for Paper 2. 

KS4 builds on the acquired knowledge and understanding acquired from KS3. It layers on the Subject Specific content for the GCSE Literature course and builds further on the introduction of specific question related skills taught in years 7-9, preparing pupils for the rigours of the Language exam in terms of Reading/ Writing requirements and time conditions. 

Year Ten 

The aim of year 10 is to equip pupils with the bulk of learning needed for their English Literature GCSE, but also interleave the skills required for the English Language GCSE and the variety of questions they will need to understand and get to grips with there.  GCSE Literature is a content based subject where pupils need to read and understand A Shakespeare Play, a 19th Century novel, a modern text, an anthology of 15 poems, and unseen poetry, so we aim to cover this in year 10 so pupils have the maximum amount of time to revise and retrieve throughout year 11 and onto the GCSE exams. 

An Inspector Calls by JB Priestley 

We begin Year 10 by studying the Modern texts aspect of the Literature GCSE where pupils draw together all the previous skills taught through KS3 in relation to knowledge of the narrative, themes, characters and ideas supported with well-chosen quotations; analysis of the writer’s methods (language and structure) to create meaning and effect using subject terminology (AO2), and showing understanding of the relationships between texts and their contexts in which they are written.  This text is chosen first as it offers the most simple introduction into the GCSE Literature course texts and the expectations in terms of exam content.  It is the most recent text we study and therefore ‘closest’ to the pupil’s experiences as it draws on more recent historical contextual understanding such as WW1 and 2, and the post war Socialist movement in British Politics. 

AQA Power and Conflict poetry anthology by various 

The Anthology of poetry for the Literature GCSE is studied in sections throughout the year, following major text study and in homework packs over holiday periods. Pupils culminate the poetic study they have engaged with throughout KS3 and employ the same skills as used previously with An Inspector Calls but transpose them onto the shorter form writing of poetry, as well as continuing the use of the more distinct Subject Specific Terminology associated with poetic form. 

A Christmas Carol by  Charles Dickens 

Pupils continue Year 10 by engaging in the study of A Christmas Carol, sustaining the use of the skills from the previous two units, and building on the pupil’s understanding of writing in exam style and length, whilst including the relevant and specific details and content necessary for success.  The text moves the pupils back historically and contextually, but still allows them to retain some sense of ‘contact’ with the novel due to its links to Portsmouth and the local area, thus allowing them some sense of relationship with the story. 

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare 

Pupils conclude the GCSE Literature texts by using the skills honed through the previous two units to study Romeo and Juliet following the Christmas break.  As the hardest and most difficult to understand text, we save this until later in the year, to allow pupils the time to adapt and become better acquainted with the level of content and expectation in relation to the GCSE.  As the chronologically furthest text and with the most unusual and difficult language, pupils need the time to prepare for this, and the difficulties understanding the more complex and unfamiliar historical context associated with it.   

Unseen Poetry 

Following the textual study, pupils return to poetry and work on the Unseen poetry element of the English Literature GCSE.  We save this unit until later in year 10 as it calls on the previous skills pupils have used in the preceding units but also allows them to begin to use the skill of comparison and working with an unknown and unfamiliar text, which is key to the work they will continue to undertake on the GCSE Language course content.   In this unit we draw from the wide range of the Literary canon and more obscure examples to expose the pupils to previously unseen and unheard texts from both historical and contemporary sources so they are prepared for the unpredictability of the exam rigour on this question. 

GCSE English Language Paper 1 

At the end of year 10 pupils begin their English Language GCSE teaching in earnest.  They will already have experienced the skills and content through interleaved elements within the Literature teaching but here they have the opportunity to focus solely on the exam structure of the GCSE as well as the often subtle differences between the Reading questions on the exams and the two heavily weighted writing sections which make up half the whole GCSE mark in two questions.  They will need to draw together all their experiences in KS3 and the work they have done so far within Literature to ensure that they are fully aware of the expectations that will be placed upon them in order to perform well in the exam.   

The skills of: identifying and interpreting explicit and implicit information and ideas; explaining, commenting on and analysing how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, and using relevant subject terminology to support their views; evaluating texts critically and support this with appropriate textual references, will all be tested, and pupils need to know where and how these relate to the different Reading questions they will face.   

Equally, the writing section of the exam requires pupils to be fully aware of the expectations and time-limitations placed upon them in the exam.  They need to be adaptable and keenly focussed in readiness for them exam and the mode of assessment that requires them to work quickly and promptly, but precisely and in detail where required.  The skills of: communicating clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences;  organising information and ideas;  using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts; using a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation, are all key elements to success here and pupils must build on the skills of creative writing that they have been engaging in for many years throughout school but adapt their understanding and output accordingly, and in line with exam expectations. 

By working explicitly on the questions and allowing pupils to have the time to learn the different approaches and skills the exam board is looking for, they are able to build up their understanding of the exam piece by piece as they move through the teaching. 

Year Eleven 

GCSE English Language Paper 2 

Moving into year 11, pupils complete their understanding and teaching of the English Language GCSE by looking at the second exam paper for that GCSE.  As the harder paper, due to the need for pupils to read, and draw from two sources (as opposed to one for Paper 1), as well as write in a persuasive style, the time limitations and difficulty of the exam are exacerbated and pupil’s understanding of the key skills required to succeed are even more critical here, which is why we place it later in KS4 and at the start of year 11. 

Pupils are expected to utilise the same skills as paper 1 in terms of reading, but with the addition of:  comparing writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts, as this is crucial in two questions in the exam.  Equally, the writing section relies on the same skills as the previous exam but requires them to write in a persuasive context, which is more technically explicit than writing due to the pupils needing to show understanding of the different modes and formats of persuasive writing in which they may be asked to write.  There is also the need for pupils to appreciate and target, the audience to which their writing is aimed.   

As with Paper 1, we work through the questions and ensure that pupils know specifically the expectations and finite details for each question so they are aware of the different approaches needed for success. 

English Language Speaking and Listening  

This short unit works as a complement to English Language GCSE teaching and allows pupils the opportunity to move away from the written component of the exam for a short while.  As an unweighted but specified element of the GCSE that is registered on exam papers, it is important that we allow time for pupils to fully engage with the expectations and produce a quality piece of work that reflects their efforts and their appreciation of the skills of: Demonstrating presentation skills in a formal setting; listening and responding appropriately to spoken language, including to questions and feedback on presentations; using spoken Standard English effectively in speeches and presentations. This acts as good continuation of the teaching for GSCE Language, and the expectations of formality/ Standard English/ grammar/ vocabulary, that are all allocated more weight in the mark scheme for those exams. 

Revisiting English Literature and English Language 

For the remainder of the year, until the final GCSE exams, the pupils and their teachers work together to ensure that the content of both GSCEs is revised in an effective and explicit manner dependant on the needs of the classes and individual pupils in order to review and revisit the content that is most needed in order to prepare effectively. 

The expectation is that teachers will draw up their own individual ‘road map’ of study, using mock exam data, in-class assessment and professional judgement, as well as regular in-class work to adapt, review and plan ahead to ensure that pupils are engaged in, and working on, the right texts/ questions and focusses for them in order to maximise success in their exams.  

Phonics and Early Reading

The context of our school

Mayfield is a unique all-through setting that accommodates over 1400 pupils. Our Primary Phase houses 538 pupils in total of whom, 2% have English as an additional language and 21% are pupil premium. 14% of our pupils have special educational with 2% of these pupils receiving EHCP provision. At Mayfield, it is essential that our approach to teaching phonics and reading is accessible to all learners, regardless of background.

 

Intent

Phonics (reading and spelling)

At Mayfield, we believe that all our children can become fluent readers and writers. This is why we teach reading through Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised, which is a systematic and synthetic phonics programme. We start teaching phonics in Reception and follow the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised progression, which ensures children build on their growing knowledge of the alphabetic code, mastering phonics to read and spell as they move through school.

 

As a result, we strive to ensure that all children are able to tackle any unfamiliar words as they read. At Mayfield, we also model the application of the alphabetic code through phonics in shared reading and writing, both inside and outside of the phonics lesson and across the curriculum. We have a strong focus on language development for our children because we know that speaking and listening are crucial skills for reading and writing in all subjects.

 

Comprehension

At Mayfield, we value reading as a crucial life skill. It is our aim that by the time children leave us, they read confidently for meaning and regularly enjoy reading for pleasure. We aim to provide our readers with the tools to tackle unfamiliar vocabulary. We encourage our children to see themselves as readers for both pleasure and purpose.

 

Because we believe teaching every child to read is so important, we have a Reading Leader who drives the early reading programme in our school. This person is highly skilled at teaching phonics and reading, and they monitor and support our reading team, so everyone teaches with fidelity to the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised programme.

 

Implementation (EYFS, Y1 and Y2)

· We provide a balance of child-led and adult-led experiences for all children that meet the curriculum expectations for ‘Communication and language’ and ‘Literacy’. These include:

o sharing high-quality stories and poems

o learning a range of nursery rhymes and action rhymes

o activities that develop focused listening and attention, including oral blending

o attention to high-quality language.

· We endeavour to work alongside our on-site Nursery to ensure that our pupils are well prepared to begin learning grapheme-phoneme correspondences (GPCs) and blending in Reception.

 

Daily phonics lessons in Reception and Year 1

· We teach phonics for 30 minutes a day. In Reception, we build from 10-minute lessons, with additional daily oral blending games, to the full-length lesson as quickly as possible. Each Friday, we review the week’s teaching to help children become fluent readers.

· Children make a strong start in Reception: teaching begins in Week 2 of the Autumn term. · We follow the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised expectations of progress:

o Children in Reception are taught to read and spell words using Phase 2 and 3 GPCs, and words with adjacent consonants (Phase 4) with fluency and accuracy.

o Children in Year 1 review Phase 3 and 4 and are taught to read and spell words using Phase 5 GPCs with fluency and accuracy.

 

Keep-up lessons ensure every child learns to read

· Any child who needs additional practice has Keep-up support, taught by a fully trained adult. Keep-up lessons match the structure of class teaching, and use the same procedures, resources and mantras, but in smaller steps with more repetition, so that every child secures their learning.

· We timetable phonics lessons for any child in Year 2 or 3 who is not fully fluent at reading or has not passed the Phonics Screening Check. These children urgently need to catch up, so the gap between themselves and their peers does not widen. We use the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised assessments to identify the gaps in their phonic knowledge and teach to these using the Keep-up resources – at pace.

· If any child in Year 3 to 6 has gaps in their phonic knowledge when reading or writing, we plan phonics ‘catch-up’ lessons to address specific reading/writing gaps.

 

Teaching reading:

· In EYFS, we teach children to read through reading practice sessions three times a week. These:

· are taught by a fully trained adult to small groups of approximately six children

· use books matched to the children’s secure phonic knowledge using the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised assessments and book matching grids on pages 11–20 of ‘Application of phonics to reading’

· are monitored by the class teacher, who rotates and works with each group on a regular basis.

· Each reading practice session has a clear focus, so that the demands of the session do not overload the children’s working memory. The reading practice sessions have been designed to focus on three key reading skills:

o decoding

o prosody: teaching children to read with understanding and expression

o comprehension: teaching children to understand the text.

· In EYFS, these sessions start after the first 6 weeks. Children who are not yet decoding have daily additional blending practice, so that they quickly learn to blend and can begin to read books.

· In Year 1 and 2, we teach reading in this way but using a slightly different structure. Prosody and comprehension are targeted daily during whole class reading sessions and each day the class teacher or trained support staff member reads with a focused group of six children. We utilise the whole class reading sessions to expose children to a variety of different ‘Reading for pleasure’ books. These books are shared by the teacher/trained member of staff. The focus of these daily whole class reading sessions is for the teacher to share the text, model reading with prosody and develop pupils’ comprehension skills. Staff delivering these sessions focus on unpicking punctuation when reading aloud, identifying tricky words and words containing graphemes taught across the week. The text is read to and shared with the pupils, so that they can access it and allows them to focus on reading with fluency and expression. Once they are fluent and can imitate the teacher/skilled member of staff confidently, pupils are expected to answer questions about the text to showcase their understanding. Group reading practice sessions are taught daily and follow the same structure as EYFS.

· We timetable phonics lessons/’catch up’ sessions for any child in Year 2 or 3 who is not fully fluent at reading or has not passed the Phonics Screening Check. These children urgently need to catch up, so the gap between themselves and their peers does not widen. We use the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised assessments to identify the gaps in their phonic knowledge and teach to these using the Keep-up resources – at pace.

· If any child in Year 3 to 6 has gaps in their phonic knowledge when reading or writing, we plan phonics ‘catch-up’ lessons to address specific reading/writing gaps.

 

Home reading

· The decodable reading practice book is sent home as an eBook to ensure success is shared with the family.

o Reading for pleasure books also go home for parents to share and read to children.

o An additional fully decodable reader of the same colour band is sent home with the pupils in addition to their eBook, so that they have a physical book to

 

 

practice with. These texts only include graphemes previously taught and not ones that the pupils are yet to be exposed to.

o We use the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised parents’ resources to engage our families and share information about phonics, the benefits of sharing books, how children learn to blend and other aspects of our provision, both online and through workshops.

 

Ensuring consistency and pace of progress

· Our aim is that every teacher in our school will have been trained to teach reading, so we have the same expectations of progress. We all aspire to use the same language, routines, and resources to teach children to read so that we lower children’s cognitive load.

· Weekly content grids map each element of new learning to each day, week, and term for the duration of the programme.

· Lesson templates, Prompt cards and ‘How to’ videos ensure teachers all have a consistent approach and structure for each lesson.

· The Reading Leader and SLT use Prompt cards to regularly monitor and observe teaching; they use the summative data to identify children who need additional support and gaps in learning.

 

Ensuring reading for pleasure

‘Reading for pleasure is the single most important indicator of a child’s success.’ (OECD 2002) ‘The will influences the skill and vice versa.’ (OECD 2010)

 

We value reading for pleasure highly and work hard as a school to grow our Reading for Pleasure pedagogy.

 

· We read to children every day. We choose these books carefully as we want children to experience a wide range of books, including books that reflect the children at Mayfield and our local community as well as books that open windows into other worlds and cultures.

· We are prioritising the development of inviting book corner/displays in each classroom that encourages a love for reading. We curate these books and talk about them to entice children to read a wide range of books.

· In Reception, children have access to the reading corner every day in their free flow time and the books are continually refreshed.

· Children from Reception onwards have a home reading record. The parent/carer records comments to share with the adults in school.

· As the children progress through the school, they are encouraged to write their own comments and keep a list of the books/authors that they have read.

The school library is made available for classes to use at protected times. Children across the school have regular opportunities to engage with a wide range of Reading for Pleasure events (book fairs, author visits and workshops, national events etc).

 

 

Impact

Assessment (EYFS, Y1, Y2 and Y3)

Assessment is used to monitor progress and to identify any child needing additional support as soon as they need it. · Assessment for learning is used:

o Daily within class to identify children needing Keep-up support

o Weekly in the Review lesson to assess gaps, address these immediately and secure fluency of GPCs, words and spellings. · Summative assessment is used:

o Every six weeks to assess progress, to identify gaps in learning that need to be addressed, to identify any children needing additional support and to plan the Keep-up support that they need.

o By SLT and scrutinised through the Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised assessment tracker, to narrow attainment gaps between different groups of children and so that any additional support for teachers can be put into place.

 

Statutory assessment

· Children in Year 1 sit the Phonics Screening Check. Any child not passing the check re-sits it in Year 2.

Ongoing assessment for catch-up

· Children who require ‘catch up’ phonics support in Year 2 to 6, are assessed through their teacher’s ongoing formative assessment as well as through the half-termly Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised summative assessments.

 

Reading in KS2

Implementation

In addition to the catch-up sessions for any child in Years 3 to 6, needing further support with the application of phonics, shared reading sessions are delivered to Years 3-6 as part of daily English lessons.

 

These sessions are carefully planned using the English core text driver and concentrate on the five main reading skills – Vocabulary, Inference, Prediction, Explanation and Summarising. Teachers across KS2 explicitly teach each of these skills through modelling and demonstrating to and with the children. Pupils are given opportunities to discuss, analyse and answer comprehensive questions linked to each of the five reading elements.

 

As well as whole class shared reading sessions, children across KS2 practice their decoding and fluency skills by reading on a 1:1 basis. Children read with an adult once every fortnight, which is recorded on a 1:1 reading record. Children read either their banded book or their chosen library book, if they are a free reader.

 

Destination Reader

Our current Y3 children are trialing a new reading programme. The programme, Destination Reader, is an approach to teaching reading in KS2. It involves daily sessions incorporating whole class modeling prior to the children applying these skills through partner work and independent reading.

The approach encompasses the key principles of effective reading provision and fully meets the requirements of the National Curriculum. It also builds a culture of reading for pleasure and purpose.

 

Destination reader covers all the expectations for the KS2 National Curriculum for reading: Word reading and breadth of reading is built on throughout the lessons with an explicit focus on understanding and engaging with texts. The programme blends a range of learning behaviours and reading strategies that, brought together, allow children to explore and understand texts independently, at a deeper level.

 

Once these learning behaviors have been embedded, the children learn 7 key reading strategies in turn which help them deepen their understanding of texts.

 

By initially concentrating on one strategy at a time, teachers can support and challenge children to develop their skills through high expectations of oral and written use of the strategies. The strategies are then combined as the children progress and applied to different forms of texts such as poetry and non-fiction. These strategies equip children with a robust toolkit to apply when reading across the curriculum and at home. The daily Destination Reader session combines metacognitive approaches with these behaviors and strategies through the following structure:

 

Over time the practice, learning behaviors, strategies and stems enshrined in the approach support the children’s independent learning across the curriculum. Coupled with Reading Snapshots, the approach to formative assessment devised to sit alongside Destination Reader, children and teachers feel empowered by the knowledge of which skills have been achieved and which skills are yet to be grasped – making progress clearer and better evidenced.

 

We are aiming to roll out this programme to the whole of KS2 by the end of the Summer Term.

 

Impact

Assessment

At the start of each academic year, all KS2 pupils are assessed on the 2019 ‘Toe by Toe’ reading test, which provides each child with a standardised reading age. This data is used to identify our lowest 20% of readers across the key stage. These children are then assessed using the Little Wandle termly phonic assessments so that catch-up sessions can be planned and delivered.

In addition to the ‘Toe by Toe’ assessment, all children across KS2 complete a running record review. These are conducted every half-term for all pupils reading banded books, so that progress can be measured. This information is recorded, tracked, and monitored on our reading assessment tracker.

 

As well as the running records and reading age-standardized scores, teachers use the children’s 1:1 reading records and reading journal outcomes to assist with their half-termly and end-of-year teacher assessment judgment. Teachers at Mayfield use an extensive evidence base to secure their end-of-year judgments so that assessment data is accurate and robust.

 

Reading in KS3.

 

Implementation

In KS3, pupils participate in weekly Accelerated Reader (AR) lessons, which enable pupils to read to an adult, take quizzes on books they have read to assess their understanding, and spend time in our inviting library. As part of these sessions, the pupils complete a shared reading session, led by the teacher, based on an age-appropriate text.

Pupils are given opportunities to discuss key themes, explore characters and settings while identifying genre features across a wide range of literature. Shared reading tasks are designed so that pupils can develop their oracy skills in addition to their written comprehension.

 

As well as the Accelerated Reader programme, pupils in Years 7 & 8 attend daily Resilience sessions, which focus on developing reading and basic literacy skills. Pupils are allocated the first half-an-hour of each day to read, change books, share texts with an adult, and complete tasks that consolidate and embed basic literacy skills. Within this daily programme, pupils are given opportunities to read, analyse and discuss topical non-fiction articles, which promote an awareness of news and events happening around the world.

 

 

At present, two of our Y7 Resilience classes are trialing the Destination Reader programme that is currently being trialed in our Y3 Primary classes. These reading sessions have been adapted for KS3 pupils and have been implemented within daily Resilience sessions. As a school, we are working alongside practitioners from Hackney Primary Schools, which is facilitated by the Hackney Learning Trust.

 

Impact

Assessment

At the start of each term, pupils in Y7, 8, and 9 complete a Star Test, which generates a standardised reading age and a Zone of Proximal Development score. These scores are used to allocate colour ranges, which assist pupils in finding books matched to their reading ability. In addition to completing termly Star Tests, pupils are encouraged to complete quizzes once they have finished reading a book. These tests are analyzed by teachers and discussed with pupils so that scores lower than the 85% pass rate are addressed.

Pupils with reading ages below 12 years are targeted and added to our Resilience Catch Up Interventions. These pupils receive daily support, which is carefully planned to close the gap. This data is tracked throughout the academic year to monitor progress and attainment.

Mathematics is a beautiful subject. It provides pupils with powerful ways to describe, analyse, change, and improve the world. Pupils can experience a sense of awe and wonder as they appreciate the power of mathematics and make links between different areas of mathematics and the history of how Mathematics has developed.  

Pupils will be shown how to “master “mathematics following a Mastery style of teaching allowing them to develop their fluency, reasoning, and problem-solving skills every lesson.  

We aim for our pupils to become resourceful, reflective, responsible, and respectful citizens in an ever-changing society who can think mathematically, reason, to be resilient when solving problems and assess risk in a range of contexts. They will develop the skills to support their understanding in science, technology and engineering as well as everyday tasks essential for keeping safe and healthy and maintaining their own economic well-being. We aim for pupils to share our passion for mathematics and find the subject both enjoyable and fascinating.  

As a result of good teaching and learning, our pupils are encouraged to develop into thinking individuals who are mathematically literate and can achieve their potential.

Strand: Number

  • Recognises some numerals of personal significance 
  • Recognises numerals 1 to 5 
  • Select the correct numeral to represent 1- 5, then 1-10 objects 
  • Counts up to three or four objects by saying a number name for each item 
  • Counts actions or objects which cannot be moved 
  • Counts objects to 10, and beginning to count beyond 10 
  • Counts out up to six objects from a larger group 
  • Counts an irregular arrangement of up to ten objects 
  • ELG – count reliably with numbers from one to 20 
  • One more, one less 
  • Says the number that is one more than a given number 
  • ELG – with numbers from one to 20, say which number is one more or less than a given number 

Strand: Measurement

  • Length, weight, and capacity 
  • Orders two or three items by length or height 
  • Orders two items by weight or capacity 
  • Time 
  • Orders and sequences of familiar events 
  • Measures short periods of time in simple ways 
  • ELG – children use everyday language to talk about time 

Strand - Geometry

Pattern 

  • Uses familiar objects and common shapes to create and recreate patterns 
  • ELG – recognise, create, and describe patterns 

Shape 

  • Beginning to use mathematical names for ‘solid’ 3D shapes and ‘flat’ 2D shapes, and mathematical terms to describe shapes 
  • Uses familiar objects and common shapes to create and recreate patterns and build models 
  • ELG – explore the characteristics of everyday objects and shapes and use mathematical language to describe them 

 

Strand: Number

Year 1

  • Count to and across 100, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number 
  • Count, read and write numbers to 100 in numerals, count in multiples of twos, fives, and tens 
  • Identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial representations including the number line, and use the language of equal to, more than, less than (fewer), most, least 
  • Read and write numbers from 1 to 20 in numerals and words 
  • Given a number, identify one more and one less

 

Strand: Number

  • Understand and use place value for decimals, measures, and integers of any size.  
  • Order positive and negative integers, decimals, and fractions; use the number line as a model for ordering of the real numbers; use the symbols =, ≠, ≤, ≥ 
  • Round numbers and measures to an appropriate degree of accuracy [for example, to a number of decimal places or significant figures] 
  • Use approximation through rounding to estimate answers and calculate possible resulting errors expressed using inequality notation a<x≤b 
  • Interpret and compare numbers in standard form A x 10n 1≤A< 10, where n is a positive or negative integer or zero 
  • Use standard units of mass, length, time, money, and other measures, including with decimal quantities 
  • Use a calculator and other technologies to calculate results accurately and then interpret them appropriately.  
  • Appreciate the infinite nature of the sets of integers, real and rational numbers. 

Strand: Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication & Division

  • Use the concepts and vocabulary of prime numbers, factors (or divisors), multiples, common factors, common multiples, highest common factor, lowest common multiple, prime factorisation, including using product notation and the unique factorisation property  
  • Use the four operations, including formal written methods, applied to integers, decimals, proper and improper fractions, and mixed numbers, all both positive and negative  
  • Use conventional notation for the priority of operations, including brackets, powers, roots, and reciprocals  
  • Recognise and use relationships between operations including inverse operations  
  • Use integer powers and associated real roots (square, cube and higher), recognise powers of 2, 3, 4, 5 and distinguish between exact representations of roots and their decimal approximations 
  • Use approximation through rounding to estimate answers and calculate possible resulting errors expressed using inequality notation a<x≤b 

Strand: Decimals and Percentages

  • Order positive and negative integers, decimals, and fractions; use the number line as a model for ordering of the real numbers; use the symbols =, ≠, ≤, ≥ 
  • Work interchangeably with terminating decimals and their corresponding fractions (such as 3.5 and 2 7 or 0.375 and 8 3)  
  • Define percentage as ‘number of parts per hundred,’ interpret percentages and percentage changes as a fraction or a decimal, interpret these multiplicatively, express one quantity as a percentage of another, compare two quantities using percentages, and work with percentages greater than 100%  
  • Interpret fractions and percentages as operators

Strand: Ratio and Proportion

  • Change freely between related standard units [for example time, length, area, volume/capacity, mass] 
  • Use scale factors, scale diagrams and maps 
  • Express one quantity as a fraction of another, where the fraction is less than 1 and greater than 1  
  • Use ratio notation, including reduction to simplest form 
  • Divide a given quantity into two parts in a given part: part or part: whole ratio; express the division of a quantity into two parts as a ratio 
  • Understand that a multiplicative relationship between two quantities can be expressed as a ratio or a fraction 
  • Relate the language of ratios and the associated calculations to the arithmetic of fractions and to linear functions 
  • Solve problems involving percentage change, including percentage increase, decrease and original value problems and simple interest in financial mathematics 
  • Solve problems involving direct and inverse proportion, including graphical and algebraic representations 
  • Use compound units such as speed, unit pricing and density to solve problems. 

Strand: Algebra

  • Use and interpret algebraic notations, including: 
  1. ab in place of a × b  

  2. 3y in place of y + y + y and 3 × y  

  3. a2 in place of a × a, a3 in place of a × a × a; a2 b in place of a × a × b  

  4. b a in place of a ÷ b  

  5. Coefficients written as fractions rather than as decimals  

  6. Brackets 

  • Substitute numerical values into formulae and expressions, including scientific formulae  
  • Understand and use the concepts and vocabulary of expressions, equations, inequalities, terms, and factors 
  • Simplify and manipulate algebraic expressions to maintain equivalence by:  
  • collecting like terms  
  • multiplying a single term over a bracket 
  • taking out common factors  
  • expanding products of two or more binomials 
  • Understand and use standard mathematical formulae; rearrange formulae to change the subject  
  • Model situations or procedures by translating them into algebraic expressions or formulae and by using graphs 
  • Use algebraic methods to solve linear equations in one variable (including all forms that require rearrangement 
  • Work with coordinates in all four quadrants 
  • Recognise, sketch, and produce graphs of linear and quadratic functions of one variable with appropriate scaling, using equations in x and y and the Cartesian plane  
  • Interpret mathematical relationships both algebraically and graphically Mathematics – key stage 3 7  
  • Reduce a given linear equation in two variables to the standard form y = mx + c; calculate and interpret gradients and intercepts of graphs of such linear equations numerically, graphically, and algebraically  
  • Use linear and quadratic graphs to estimate values of y for given values of x and vice versa and to find approximate solutions of simultaneous linear equations 
  • Find approximate solutions to contextual problems from given graphs of a variety of functions, including piece-wise linear, exponential, and reciprocal graphs 
  • Generate terms of a sequence from either a term-to-term or a position-to-term rule  
  • Recognise arithmetic sequences and find the nth term  
  • Recognise geometric sequences and appreciate other sequences that arise. 

Strand: Measure

  • Derive and apply formulae to calculate and solve problems involving perimeter and area of triangles, parallelograms, trapezia, volume of cuboids (including cubes) and other prisms (including cylinders)  
  • Calculate and solve problems involving perimeters of 2-D shapes (including circles), areas of circles and composite shapes 
  • Derive and use the standard ruler and compass constructions (perpendicular bisector of a line segment, constructing a perpendicular to a given line from/at a given point, bisecting a given angle); recognise and use the perpendicular distance from a point to a line as the shortest distance to the line 
  • Interpret mathematical relationships both algebraically and geometrically 

Strand: Geometry - shape

  • Use the properties of faces, surfaces, edges and vertices of cubes, cuboids, prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones, and spheres to solve problems in 3-D 
  • Draw and measure line segments and angles in geometric figures, including interpreting scale drawings 
  • Describe, sketch and draw using conventional terms and notations: points, lines, parallel lines, perpendicular lines, right angles, regular polygons, and other polygons that are reflectively and rotationally symmetric 
  • Use the standard conventions for labelling the sides and angles of triangle ABC, and know and use the criteria for congruence of triangles  
  • Derive and illustrate properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, and other plane figures [for example, equal lengths and angles] using appropriate language and technologies 
  • Identify and construct congruent triangles, and construct similar shapes by enlargement, with and without coordinate grids  
  • Apply the properties of angles at a point, angles at a point on a straight line, vertically opposite angles 
  • Understand and use the relationship between parallel lines and alternate and corresponding angles 
  • Derive and use the sum of angles in a triangle and use it to deduce the angle sum in any polygon, and to derive properties of regular polygons 
  • Apply angle facts, triangle congruence, similarity, and properties of quadrilaterals to derive results about angles and sides, including Pythagoras’ Theorem, and use known results to obtain simple proofs  
  • Use Pythagoras’ Theorem and trigonometric ratios in similar triangles to solve problems involving right-angled triangles 

Strand: Geometry - position and direction

  • Identify properties of, and describe the results of, translations, rotations and reflections applied to given figures 

Strand: Statistics

  • Describe, interpret, and compare observed distributions of a single variable through appropriate graphical representation involving discrete, continuous, and grouped data; and appropriate measures of central tendency (mean, mode, median) and spread (range, consideration of outliers)  
  • Construct and interpret appropriate tables, charts, and diagrams, including frequency tables, bar charts, pie charts, and pictograms for categorical data, and vertical line (or bar) charts for ungrouped and grouped numerical data 
  • Describe simple mathematical relationships between two variables (bivariate data) in observational and experimental contexts and illustrate using scatter graphs. 

Strand: Probability

  • Record, describe and analyse the frequency of outcomes of simple probability experiments involving randomness, fairness, equally and unequally likely outcomes, using appropriate language and the 0-1 probability scale 
  • Understand that the probabilities of all possible outcomes sum to 1  
  • Enumerate sets and unions/intersections of sets systematically, using tables, grids, and Venn diagrams 
  • Generate theoretical sample spaces for single and combined events with equally likely, mutually exclusive outcomes and use these to calculate theoretical probabilities. 

 

In addition to consolidating subject content from Key Stage 3, pupils should be taught to: 

Strand: Number

Foundation

  • Apply systematic listing strategies 
  • Use integer powers and associated real roots (square, cube and higher), recognise powers of 2, 3, 4, 5 and distinguish between exact representations of roots and their decimal approximations 
  • Apply and interpret limits of accuracy when rounding or truncating, 
  • Calculate with roots, and with integer indices 
  • Calculate with numbers in standard form A 10n, where 1 ≤ A < 10 and n is an integer 

Higher

  • Apply systematic listing strategies, including use of the product rule for counting 
  • Estimate powers and roots of any given positive number 
  • Apply and interpret limits of accuracy when rounding or truncating, including upper and lower bounds. 
  • Calculate with roots, and with integer and fractional indices 

Strand: Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication & Division

Foundation

  • Calculate with roots, and with integer indices 
  • Calculate exactly with fractions, and multiples of π.  

Higher

  • Calculate with roots, and with integer and fractional indices
  • Calculate exactly with fractions, surds, and multiples of π; simplify surd expressions involving squares and rationalise denominators 

Strand: Fractions, Decimals and Percentages

Foundation

  •   

Higher

  • Change recurring decimals into their corresponding fractions and vice versa 

Strand: Ratio and Proportion

Foundation

  • Compare lengths, areas and volumes using ratio notation and/or scale factors; make links to similarity (including trigonometric ratios)  
  • Convert between related compound units (speed, rates of pay, prices, density, pressure) in numerical and algebraic contexts  
  • Understand that X is inversely proportional to Y is equivalent to X is proportional to 1 Y interpret equations that describe direct and inverse proportion  
  • Interpret the gradient of a straight-line graph as a rate of change; recognise and interpret graphs that illustrate direct and inverse proportion  
  • Set up, solve, and interpret the answers in growth and decay problems, including compound interest

Higher

  • Compare lengths, areas and volumes using ratio notation and/or scale factors; make links to similarity (including trigonometric ratios) 
  • Convert between related compound units (speed, rates of pay, prices, density, pressure) in numerical and algebraic contexts 
  • Understand that X is inversely proportional to Y is equivalent to X is proportional to 1 Y; {construct and} interpret equations that describe direct and inverse proportion 
  • Interpret the gradient of a straight-line graph as a rate of change; recognise and interpret graphs that illustrate direct and inverse proportion 
  • Interpret the gradient at a point on a curve as the instantaneous rate of change; apply the concepts of instantaneous and average rate of change (gradients of tangents and chords) in numerical, algebraic, and graphical contexts 
  • Set up, solve, and interpret the answers in growth and decay problems, including compound interest and work with general iterative processes

Strand: Algebra

Foundation

  • Simplify and manipulate algebraic expressions (including those involving surds) by:  
  1. factorising quadratic expressions of the form 2 x bx c + + 2 ax bx c + +, including the difference of two squares.  

  2. simplifying expressions involving sums, products, and powers, including the laws of indices 

  • Know the difference between an equation and an identity; argue mathematically to show algebraic expressions are equivalent, and use algebra to support and construct arguments  
  • Where appropriate, interpret simple expressions as functions with input and output.  
  • Use the form y mx c = + to identify parallel lines; find the equation of the line through two given points, or through one point with a given gradient  
  • Identify and interpret roots, intercepts and turning points of quadratic functions graphically; deduce roots algebraically  
  • Recognise, sketch, and interpret graphs of linear functions, quadratic functions, simple cubic functions, the reciprocal function 1 y = x y x = cos with x ≠ 0 
  • Plot and interpret graphs (including reciprocal graphs) and graphs of non-standard functions in real contexts, to find approximate solutions to problems such as simple kinematic problems involving distance, speed, and acceleration 
  • Solve quadratic equations algebraically by factorising, find approximate solutions using a graph  
  • Solve two simultaneous equations in two variables (linear/) algebraically; find approximate solutions using a graph  
  • Translate simple situations or procedures into algebraic expressions or formulae; derive an equation (or two simultaneous equations), solve the equation(s), and interpret the solution  
  • Solve linear inequalities in one variable; represent the solution set on a number line,  
  • Recognise and use sequences of triangular, square and cube numbers, simple arithmetic progressions, Fibonacci type sequences, quadratic sequences, and simple geometric progressions (r n where n is an integer, and r is a positive rational number)  
  • Deduce expressions to calculate the nth term of sequences. 

Higher

  • Simplify and manipulate algebraic expressions (including those involving surds and algebraic fractions) by:  
  • factorising quadratic expressions of the form 2 x bx c + + 2 ax bx c + +, including the difference of two squares; factorising quadratic expressions of the form 
  • Simplifying expressions involving sums, products, and powers, including the laws of indices  
  • Know the difference between an equation and an identity; argue mathematically to show algebraic expressions are equivalent, and  
  • Use algebra to support and construct arguments and proof 
  • Where appropriate, interpret simple expressions as functions with inputs and outputs; interpret the reverse process as the ‘inverse function;’ interpret the succession of two functions as a ‘composite function’ 
  • Use the form y mx c = + to identify parallel and perpendicular lines; find the equation of the line through two given points, or through one point with a given gradient  
  • Identify and interpret roots, intercepts and turning points of quadratic functions graphically; deduce roots algebraically and turning points by completing the square 
  • Recognise, sketch, and interpret graphs of linear functions, quadratic functions, simple cubic functions, the reciprocal function 1 y = x y x = cos with x ≠ 0, the exponential function x y k = y x = sin for positive values of k, and the trigonometric functions (with arguments in degrees), and y x = tan for angles of any size, sketch translations and reflections of the graph of a given function 
  • Plot and interpret graphs (including reciprocal graphs and exponential graphs) and graphs of non-standard functions in real contexts, 
  • To find approximate solutions to problems such as simple kinematic problems involving distance, speed, and acceleration  
  • Calculate or estimate gradients of graphs and areas under graphs (including quadratic and other non-linear graphs), and interpret results in cases such as distance-time graphs, velocity-time graphs, and graphs in financial contexts  
  • Recognise and use the equation of a circle with centre at the origin; find the equation of a tangent to a circle at a given point 
  • Solve quadratic equations including those that require rearrangement algebraically by factorising, by completing the square and by using the quadratic formula; find approximate solutions using a graph 
  • Solve two simultaneous equations in two variables (linear/linear or linear/quadratic) algebraically; find approximate solutions using a graph  
  • Find approximate solutions to equations numerically using iteration 
  • Translate simple situations or procedures into algebraic expressions or formulae; derive an equation (or two simultaneous equations), solve the equation(s), and interpret the solution 
  • Solve linear inequalities in one or two variables, and quadratic inequalities in one variable; represent the solution set on a number line, using set notation and on a graph 
  • Recognise and use sequences of triangular, square and cube numbers, simple arithmetic progressions, Fibonacci type sequences, quadratic sequences, and simple geometric progressions (r n where n is an integer, and r is a positive rational number or a surd) and other sequences 
  • Deduce expressions to calculate the nth term of linear {and quadratic} sequences.

Strand: Measure

Foundation

  • Calculate arc lengths, angles, and areas of sectors of circles  
  • Calculate surface areas and volumes of spheres, pyramids, cones, and composite solids  
  • Apply the concepts of congruence and similarity, including the relationships between lengths, in similar figures

Higher

  • Calculate arc lengths, angles, and areas of sectors of circles  
  • Calculate surface areas and volumes of spheres, pyramids, cones, and composite solids 
  • Apply the concepts of congruence and similarity, including the relationships between lengths, areas, and volumes in similar figures

Strand: Geometry - shape

Foundation

  • Identify and apply circle definitions and properties, including centre, radius, chord, diameter, circumference, tangent, arc, sector, and segment 
  • Construct and interpret plans and elevations of 3D shapes 
  • Interpret and use bearings 
  • Apply Pythagoras’ Theorem and trigonometric ratios to find angles and lengths in right-angled triangles} in two dimensional figures 
  • Know the exact values of sin and cos θ for 0, 30, 45, 60 90 and know the exact value of tanθ at 0, 30, 45 60

Higher

  • Identify and apply circle definitions and properties, including centre, radius, chord, diameter, circumference, tangent, arc, sector, and segment  
  • Apply and prove the standard circle theorems concerning angles, radii, tangents, and chords, and use them to prove related results} 
  • Construct and interpret plans and elevations of 3D shapes  
  • Interpret and use bearings 
  • Apply Pythagoras’ Theorem and trigonometric ratios to find angles and lengths in right-angled triangles and, where possible, general triangles in two- and three-dimensional figures 
  • Know the exact values of sin and cos θ for 0, 30, 45, 60 90 and know the exact value of tanθ at 0, 30, 45 60 
  • Know and apply the sine rule and cosine rule to find unknown lengths and angles 
  • Know and apply area = 0.5 ab Sin C to calculate the area, sides, or angles of any triangle

Strand: Geometry - position and direction

Foundation

  • Interpret and use fractional scale factors for enlargements 
  • Describe translations as 2D vectors 
  • Apply addition and subtraction of vectors, multiplication of vectors by a scalar, and diagrammatic and column representations of vectors

Higher

  • Interpret and use fractional {and negative} scale factors for enlargements 
  • Describe the changes and invariance achieved by combinations of rotations, reflections, and translations 
  • Describe translations as 2D vectors 
  • Apply addition and subtraction of vectors, multiplication of vectors by a scalar, and diagrammatic and column representations of vectors 
  • Use vectors to construct geometric arguments and proof 

Strand: Statistics

Foundation

  • Infer properties of populations or distributions from a sample, whilst knowing the limitations of sampling 
  • Interpret and construct tables and line graphs for time series data 
  • Interpret, analyse, and compare the distributions of data sets from univariate empirical distributions through: 
  • Appropriate graphical representation involving discrete, continuous, and grouped data,  
  • Appropriate measures of central tendency (including modal class) and spread 
  • Apply statistics to describe a population  
  • Use and interpret scatter graphs of bivariate data; recognise correlation and know that it does not indicate causation; draw estimated lines of best fit; make predictions; interpolate and extrapolate apparent trends whilst knowing the dangers of so doing. 

Higher

  • Infer properties of populations or distributions from a sample, whilst knowing the limitations of sampling 
  • Interpret and construct tables and line graphs for time series data 
  • Construct and interpret diagrams for grouped discrete data and continuous data, i.e., histograms with equal and unequal class intervals and cumulative frequency graphs, and know their appropriate use 
  • Interpret, analyse, and compare the distributions of data sets from univariate empirical distributions through:  
  1. appropriate graphical representation involving discrete, continuous, and grouped data, including box plots  
  2. appropriate measures of central tendency (including modal class) and spread including quartiles and inter-quartile range 
  • Apply statistics to describe a population  
  • Use and interpret scatter graphs of bivariate data; recognise correlation and know that it does not indicate causation; draw estimated lines of best fit; make predictions; interpolate and extrapolate apparent trends whilst knowing the dangers of so doing. 

Strand: Probability

Foundation

  • Apply the property that the probabilities of an exhaustive set of mutually exclusive events sum to one  
  • Use a probability model to predict the outcomes of future experiments; understand that empirical unbiased samples tend towards theoretical probability distributions, with increasing sample size  
  • Calculate the probability of independent and dependent combined events, including using tree diagrams and other representations, and know the underlying assumptions 

Higher

  • Apply the property that the probabilities of an exhaustive set of mutually exclusive events sum to one  
  • Use a probability model to predict the outcomes of future experiments; understand that empirical unbiased samples tend towards theoretical probability distributions, with increasing sample size  
  • Calculate the probability of independent and dependent combined events, including using tree diagrams and other representations, and know the underlying assumptions  
  • Calculate and interpret conditional probabilities through representation using expected frequencies with two-way tables, tree diagrams and Venn diagram.

Our Science vision at Mayfield school, from age 4 in Key Stage 1 (KS1) to age 16 in Key Stage 4 (KS4), is to deliver an inclusive Science curriculum that inspires pupils: one that encourages pupils to think beyond the boundaries of the classroom; one that encourages critical thinking and one that motivates independent thought. As a result, pupils will develop a broad range of knowledge and skills, allowing them to achieve their true potential.  Our three-year Key Stage 3 (KS3) builds on the knowledge and skills from Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 (KS2), whilst equipping pupils with a strong foundation for the requirements of the GCSE curriculum at Key Stage 4; this is achieved by focusing on the underpinning scientific ideas and vocabulary. Science offers a wealth of job opportunity prospects for the future and we aim to capitalise on the relevance of Science by clearly linking the topics taught to careers, from being a paleontologist at KS1 to a cardiologist at KS4. 

Plants 

In Year 1 and 2 pupils will learn about several types of plants and trees. Furthermore, they will also learn about the seasons and what plants need to stay healthy. 

Animals  

In Year 1 and 2 pupils will learn about distinct types of common animals and how common body parts are associated with the different senses. 

Everyday materials 

In Year 1 and 2, pupils will learn to distinguish between materials and their properties. They will then investigate  the effect forces have on these objects. 

Seasonal changes 

In Year 1 and 2, pupils will learn that the length of the days depends on the seasons and link seasonal changes to their wider environment, including plants and animals. 

Living things and their habitats 

In Years 1 and 2, pupils will learn how and where living things grow. They will learn about several types of animals and how their habitat effects their lifestyles. 

Working Scientifically (Skills) 

In Year 1 and 2 pupils ask questions about the world and recognise that when they observe the world to answer these questions, this is science. They use magnifying glasses to observe objects closely and know that they can test their questions to see if they are true. They learn that objects can be identified or sorted into groups based on their observable properties and pupils learn that they can write down numbers and words or draw pictures to record what they find. 

Plants 

In Year 3 and 4, pupils will recognise that all plants and trees have different life cycles, but that they all need energy and nutrients to survive.  Furthermore, they will understand the functions of the distinct parts of plants and their role in the reproductive cycle. 

Animals including humans 

In Year 3 and 4, pupils will learn that there is a variety of food groups, from which we need a balanced diet in order live healthily. Furthermore, they will learn the difference between vertebrates and invertebrates. 

In Year 5 and 6, pupils will learn about the respiratory and circulatory system and their role in keeping our bodies working.  They will revise healthy eating and learn about drugs (legal and illegal), alcohol and tobacco and their effects on our bodies.  

Living things and their habitats 

In Year 3 and 4, pupils will revise that living things grow, move, consume nutrients and reproduce. They will refine and develop their knowledge of animals and how their habitat effects their lives. 

In Year 5 and 6, pupils will learn more about the life cycles of living things and the reproductive cycle. They will learn about the stages of development in the human life cycle and how this links to their learning in PSHE. Furthermore, they will revise and deepen their understanding of vertebrates and invertebrates. 

Evolution and Inheritance 

In Years 5 and 6, pupils will learn about the gradual changes over time which can effect living things and that this change is called evolution. They will study the work of Charles Darwin on the theory of evolution and study fossils. 

Rocks 

In Year 3 and 4, pupils will learn about the three distinct kinds of rocks and they will know their properties. 

States of matter 

In Year 3 and 4, pupils will learn that materials are one of three states of matter and that these can be changed, sometimes as reversible and sometimes irreversible changes. 

Properties & changes of materials 

In Year 5 and 6, pupils will learn that materials can be sorted by their properties. They will also refine and deepen their understanding of how the state of matter can change and how some of these changes are reversible and some are irreversible. 

Light 

In Year 3 and 4, pupils will learn that light is a form of energy and that energy can come in different forms. They will also learn about different light sources and how light can pass through (or not) certain objects. 

In Year 5 and 6, pupils will refine and deepen their understanding of how some objects allow light through and some do not. They will also learn how they can manipulate the movement of light through the use of periscopes and light changes under water (refraction). 

Sound 

In Year 3 and 4, pupils will learn how sound is generated. They will also learn about volume, pitch and tempo and how this links to their learning in music. 

Forces and magnets 

In Year 3 and 4, pupils will learn about forces being either impact, friction or strain. They will investigate the role of magnets and study their effect on several materials, linking into their work on materials and their properties. 

In Year 5 and 6, pupils will learn, in more detail, about forces and study the work of famous scientists. They will then undertake a variety of experiments, analysing the results as necessary. 

Earth and Space 

In Year 5 and 6 pupils will learn about the Solar System and its constituent parts. They will also study the work of famous scientists and their role in the development of Astronomical understanding. 

Electricity 

In Year 3 and 4, pupils will learn how electricity is formed and how it requires a complete circuit to work. They will then study the parts of a circuit and how these can be manipulated and changed to different effects. 

In Year 5 and 6, pupils will refine their understanding of how electricity is created and the variety of objects which can be used in a circuit. They will perform experiments to understand the impact of variables on both series and parallel circuits and study the work of famous scientists. 

Working Scientifically (Skills) 

In Years 3 and 4, pupils ask questions and answer them by setting up scientific enquiries and know how to make relevant predictions that will be tested in a scientific enquiry. They recognise that in a fair test one variable is altered and one variable is measured while all other conditions are kept the same. They are developing how to use a range of equipment to measure accurately and know how to draw bar charts; how to correctly label a diagrams; how to use a coloured key; how to draw a neat table; how to draw a classification key; how to show the relationship using a two-way table. They develop their knowledge of how to write a simple scientific enquiry write-up from introduction, equipment list and method to recording their results and forming a conclusion with structured guidance.  

They develop their understanding of how to precisely form a scientific enquiry write-up into a brief oral discussion of what was found in a scientific enquiry. Pupils can recognise that scientific enquiries can suggest relationships, but that they do not prove whether a prediction is true. They know that scientific enquiries are limited by the accuracy of the measurements (and the measuring equipment used) and by the extent to which conditions during the experiment vary, and that repeating enquiries, measurements and taking measures to keep conditions as consistent as possible can improve an enquiry. The children recognise that the conclusions of scientific enquiries can lead to further questions, where results can be clarified or extended to different contexts (e.g. effect of changing sunlight on a plant – does this work with other plants / different types of light / etc). In addition, they know that they can draw conclusions from the findings of other scientists and know that a theory is an explanation of observations that has been tested to some extent and that a hypothesis is an explanation that has not yet been tested, but that can be tested through a scientific enquiry. 

In Years 5 and 6, the pupils will learn how to choose appropriate variables to test a hypothesis (e.g. plant height as a dependent variable when measuring effect of light on plant growth). They will learn how to identify conditions that were imperfectly controlled and can explain how these might affect results. Furthermore, they will recognise how to accurately use further measuring devices, including digital and analogue scales, measuring cylinders and beakers, recognising the relative accuracy of each device. Pupils will master how and when to repeat measurements, how to find an average of a set of measurements and how to recognize and remove outliers from a set of data, justifying the removal as a potential mis-measurement. As well as this, they will practice how to independently write a simple scientific enquiry write-up including an introduction, a list of equipment, a numbered method, a detailing of results and a conclusion. The children will learn how to present brief oral findings from an enquiry, speaking clearly and with confidence and using notes where necessary. Furthermore, they will recognise examples of instances where scientific evidence has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments (e.g. fossil records as evidence of natural selection). In addition, children will learn how to choose appropriate variables to test a hypothesis (e.g. plant height as a dependent variable when measuring effect of light on plant growth) and how to identify conditions that were imperfectly controlled and can explain how these might affect results. They will learn how to accurately use further measuring devices, including digital and analogue scales, measuring cylinders and beakers, recognising the relative accuracy of each device and when to repeat measurements, how to find an average of a set of measurements and how to recognise and remove outliers from a set of data, justifying the removal as a potential mismeasurement. Pupils will learn how to independently write a simple scientific enquiry write-up including an introduction, a list of equipment, a numbered method, a detailing of results and a conclusion. They will learn how to present brief oral findings from an enquiry, speaking clearly and with confidence and using notes where necessary and recognise examples of instances where scientific evidence has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments (e.g. fossil records as evidence of natural selection) 

Key Stage Three (KS3) Science  

The three subject areas of Science, (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) are taught in rotation so that pupils receive a balance of all three disciplines across each academic year, from year 7 through to year 9.   

Subject content – Biology 

Biology is the study of the natural world and all living things in it, from the largest mammals down to our very own microscopic DNA.  In Biology lessons, pupils will gain an understanding of the living world around them and interactions and interdependences in place from cells in a body to organisms in a habitat.  They will explore the human impact on our planet and the considerations we need to have in place to ensure the survival of all organisms. 

From years 7 to 9, pupils will study content in the following areas: structure and function of living organisms, cells and organisation, the skeletal and muscular system, gas exchange systems, reproduction, health, cellular respiration and genetics and evolution. 

The order in which this content is covered is designed to enable pupils to both broaden and deepen their learning, whilst also providing opportunity to practice working scientifically skills.  For example, in year 7 pupils are taught about the animal and plant cells and the organelles contained in them as well as the role these organelles play in the cell. In topics that follow, pupils then look at how cells are organised to form larger structures from tissues to organs and then how these structures and systems come together to form organisms.  The topic of cells is then revisited in year 8, when exploring their role in enabling respiration via mitochondria, and again in year 8 and year 9 when considering how genetic traits are passed on through DNA. 

Subject Content: Chemistry 

Chemistry is the study of the material word.  In their Chemistry lessons pupils gain an understanding of how chemicals interact and how we can use this to our advantage to make new products from fireworks to medicines. 

Over the course of the KS3, pupils will cover the following content during their Chemistry lessons: the periodic table, elements, compounds and mixtures, the structure of the atom, chemical symbols and formulae, a key range of reactions such as neutralisation and combustion, how these reactions can be represented using chemical equations and the Earth’s structure and its atmosphere. 

As pupils move through KS3 they deepen and broaden their knowledge and understanding.  For example, in year 7 pupils learn about atoms and the periodic table containing all the known elements.  They quickly build on this knowledge to show how compounds are formed.  As pupils progress, they start to represent the formation of these compounds, and other chemical reactions, as word equations and then symbol equations, linking us back to the periodic table and the information shown on it.  Pupils also go from describing atoms as a particle, modelled as spheres in year 7, to learning it is made up of subatomic particles and drawing atomic structure, allocating electrons to shells orbiting the nucleus when they reach year 9.  This later content acts as a bridge to KS4 so that pupils have a solid foundation to future learning. 

Subject Content: Physics  

Physics helps pupils understand the world around them, linking cause and effect.  It develops their critical thinking and problem-solving skills.  Physics has helped to drive many technological advancements, impacting on both society, the environment, and our economy. 

Over the course of year 7 through to year 9 pupils will cover the following content during their Physics lessons: energy, energy changes and transfers, motion, forces, pressure in fluids, changes in matter, waves, electricity, electromagnetism and magnetism. Physics requires good mathematical skills and pupils will have opportunities through each topic taught to practice their working scientifically skills so that they are confident at handling data and using equations.  To support this both the Science and Maths departments have worked together to use common examples and language that pupils understand and can transfer between the two subjects. 

The contents and delivery of the topics taught in Physics are designed to support a pupil's progress in their development of both knowledge and scientific skills. Fundamental ideas taught in earlier years underpin this new learning.  For example, pupils learn of the different types of circuit components in year 7 and what an electric current is along with the basics of resistance in a circuit.  When in year 9 pupils return to this topic, looking at how resistance differs in series and parallel circuits, collecting data and then carrying out calculations as evidence of this behaviour. 

Working Scientifically (Skills) 

Working Scientifically skills are integral to Science lessons and build on the skills developed at KS2 (as detailed above). The areas covered by pupils at KS3 includes a focus on asking questions, forming hypothesis and making predictions, planning and carrying out investigations, determining risk, handling and interpreting data including graph drawing, evaluating the reliability of data and the method used to obtain it and considering possible sources of error, graphically representing results and analysing data to name but a few. 

The development of these skills occurs progressively, over the course of three years. In individual lessons they will focus on learning or developing explicit skills, such as determining variables or selecting appropriate equipment, which they will then combine when carrying out full investigations.  There will be opportunities for pupils to carry out several full investigations, such as ‘huddling penguins’ or our ‘sharks' blood’ investigations, each year as a means to both consolidate learning and apply it to new situations. 

Science at KS4 (years 10 and 11) continue to be taught using a combination of content and working scientifically skills so that pupils deepen their understanding of the world around them. 

Subject Content: Biology 

During year 10 and year 11 pupils will focus their study of lessons that cover the following areas of content: cell structure, transport systems withing organisms, key organs and systems such as the heart and digestive system, diseases and how we can treat them, co-ordination and control withing living organisms to maintain internal body conditions, photosynthesis and why it is essential to all life, ecosystems, evolution, and inheritance and variation. 

These topics build on learning from KS3 and frequently from content in earlier GCSE units.  The topic of cells remains a central concept underpinning a range of lessons. For example, in the B1 Cells unit pupils learn how cells divide through the process of mitosis, in B6 higher pupils learn of cell division by meiosis to produce gametes in the reproductive organs.  Pupils also gain understanding of cell differentiation and are asked to consider the ethics around the use of embryonic stem cells whilst also considering the possible technological advancements that stem cells enable in medicine.  In the B6 Inheritance unit pupils then learn how to calculate the probability of inheriting genetic characteristics, such as brown eyes or polydactyly, by applying knowledge of recessive and dominant genes. 

Subject Content: Chemistry 

During year 10 and 11 pupils will focus their study on lessons that cover content in the following areas: atomic structure and the periodic table, structure and bonding and the properties of matter, chemical changes, energy changes in chemistry, rate of reaction and the extent of chemical change, chemical analysis, chemical and allied industries and Earth and atmospheric Sciences. 

Again, expanding on learning at KS3 and then building on early KS4 units, pupils engage in lessons to deepen and broaden their understanding of the material world.  For example, pupils will take the idea of energy changes in chemical reactions and link them to useful processes from cooling gels to self-heating food cans.  They will then carry out practical experiments to determine the energy change in a system and link this to bond energy calculations.  Pupils will also understand the wider implication of using certain reactions, such as combustion, by considering their impact on the environment and exploring viable solutions to lessen our impact. 

Subject Content: Physics 

Over the course of Year 10 and 11 pupils will cover the following areas during their physics lesson: energy changes in systems, forces, motion including road safety, waves, electrical circuits, electricity in the home, using magnetism and electromagnetism, the structure of matter, atomic structure, and nuclear radiation. 

Pupils will continue to deepen their understanding of the physical world at KS4.  For example, in a cross over with chemistry, pupils explore the structure of the atom, learning how our model of the atom has developed over time from a simple sphere to the nuclear model we have today.  Their understanding of the nucleus deepens as they consider the three types of nuclear radiation and then link it back to the use of alpha particles in determining the nuclear model of an atom with a positive nucleus surrounded by negative electrons.  Nuclear radiation as an energy source for homes and factories is explored, during which pupils have the opportunities to form their own informed opinions on the next steps needed for a cleaner, carbon-neutral Britain. 

Working Scientifically (Skills) 

Pupils will develop and practice working scientifically skills as they move through a range of units across all three disciplines of Science.  They underpin many of the learning opportunities that take place within lessons.  The four key areas and examples of each are detailed below: 

1. The development of scientific thinking 

Examples of this include considering how our modelling for the structure of the atom has changed and why, considering the impact of humans on habitats and understanding the limitation of data when it comes to fossil records. 

2. Experimental skills and strategies 

Examples of this include: planning and carrying out a survey on population size whilst considering the equipment to be used and then evaluating the limitation of data due to sample size. 

3. Analysis and evaluation 

Examples of this include collecting data to show the relationship between force applied and the extension of a spring then representing data recorded during a practical graphically as well as using diagrams to represent numerical data such as Sankey diagrams or looking for patterns in rate of reaction graphs. 

4. Vocabulary, units, symbols and nomenclature 

Examples of this include: calculating magnification and representing this in standard form, selecting the correct units when performing specific heat capacity calculations and considering order of magnitude when looking at the electromagnetic spectrum 

In the International Languages Department we not only support the learning of a language; instead we encourage the understanding and respect of other cultures and their traditions. We wish for our pupils to be a fully rounded global citizen and able to use these skills of interaction and acceptance in the outside world.  

We believe that everyone has the potential to explore language acquisition and we foster this curiosity with a love for learning, a culture of acceptance and an understanding of diversity.  

Our pupils will become confident and comfortable to exchange in spoken and written forms of communication with people in an international language. Throughout the curriculum and through the years, we provide steppingstones to progress where our pupils start from saying “Hola” and ending up by sharing their future wishes, dreams and aspirations. 

We build our pupils to be resilient when it comes to challenges and these skills will encourage them to be independent and resourceful, allowing them to see successes in their language acquisition. As Frank Smith says “One language sets you in a corridor for life. Two languages open every door along the way,” and we provide the key to our pupils to open those doors. That key is international languages.     

As there is no National Curriculum for the teaching of Languages at Key Stage One, the objectives and themes taught to our pupils have been chosen to introduce and allow our pupils to enjoy the start of their language acquisition in Spanish. Our curriculum is shaped with ‘I can’ objectives so pupils can see what they are capable of doing and what will be coming next in their learning. Our curriculum and vocabulary acquisition is shared with a love of reading as at least one story compliments each term’s topic and the use of songs in the target language support our pupils growth in Spanish. 

Year One 

When our pupils begin their learning of Spanish in Year One, we teach them how to understand and verbally respond to simple words, short phrases and be able to answer to simple questions asked. In terms of skills developed in reading, our pupils learn how to understand simple words, read short phrases and progress to understanding simple sentences. Verbs that are used by our pupils are used in the first person singular as we encourage our pupils to speak about oneself in Spanish. Our pupils develop their Spanish vocabulary through themes of personal introduction and information, body parts and colours, animals and countries. Our pupils begin to be able to understand where Spanish is spoken in the world and enjoy their language acquisition with a selection of stories and songs in Spanish.  Our pupils can attend an extra-curricular Spanish group where the language learnt in class is explored further and pupils begin to develop a passion and understanding of language learning.   

Year Two 

When our pupils reach Year Two of their learning of Spanish, we teach them how to understand some key phonemes, especially vowels, are pronounced clearly, can understand and respond to a short conversation and able to give a short-rehearsed response to a range of questions. In terms of skills developed in reading, our pupils learn how to understand short phrases and simple sentences, able to read words and phrases and able to read a simple sentence with gaps and complete the gap with appropriate word choice. Our pupils continue to use verbs in the first person singular and understand the questions asked in second person singular. Our pupils also can use a common verb in both positive and negative forms. Our pupils revisit vocabulary from Year One and now can ask as well as respond to personal introductions and information in Spanish. Our pupils’ learning of Spanish is complimented with cultural links to Spanish cities and our pupils can identify and label features of a Spanish speaking home, city or country. We begin to introduce vocabulary through healthy lifestyle ideas and look at the necessary vocabulary linked with sports, hobbies and mealtimes. Our pupils begin to express a basic opinion with food in Spanish. Our pupils can attend an extra-curricular Spanish group where the language learnt in class is explored further and pupils begin to develop a passion and understanding of language learning.   

There is a National Curriculum expectation to teach Languages to pupils from Key Stage Two. The curriculum objectives, themes and assessment have been paired with the National Curriculum objectives and offer our pupils the development needed for their language acquisition in Spanish. Similarly to our Key Stage One curriculum, our curriculum is shaped with ‘I can’ objectives so pupils can see what they are capable of doing and what will be coming next in their learning. Our curriculum and vocabulary acquisition is shared with a love of reading as at least one story compliments each term’s topic and the use of songs in the target language support our pupils' growth in Spanish.  

Year Three 

As we have a mixture of pupils who have already learnt Spanish for two years and new pupils joining us from other Infant schools, our curriculum for Year Three offers the opportunity for Mayfield Infant pupils to reflect on their previous learning whilst our new pupils joining us will be exposed to the vocabulary and structures for the first time. Our Mayfield Infant pupils will be able to transmit their enjoyment and engagement for their Spanish learning with our new pupils and all will be on level par.  

Our pupils acquire their Spanish through three topics, each one broken down over a whole-term and this allows for our pupils to acquire, practice, and master the new vocabulary in Spanish. The topics are explained below.  

Me presento con mi monstruo. 

As we wish for our Mayfield Infant pupils to reflect on their previous learning whilst our new pupils are exposed to the vocabulary for the first time, the topic of ‘me presento con mi monstruo’, teaches our pupils how to express personal introductions and information, such as their birthday and age. Our pupils can use the vocabulary and structures to partake in rehearsed role plays, asking and answering questions regarding personal information. Our pupils then develop their language acquisition with the use of songs and stories to recall and label parts of the body. Our pupils are introduced to adjectival agreements in Spanish with the use of colours and this is applied with the vocabulary of the body parts. With this vocabulary, our pupils can design and create a description of their own monster and using verbs in the third person singular. 

En el café 

When we begin with the topic of ‘en el café,’ we see our Mayfield Infant pupils can reflect and recall previous food vocabulary and our new pupils are learning this vocabulary. Our pupils continue to use their adjectival agreements with the colours of fruit and they can link simple opinions with them. Our pupils expand their vocabulary with two stories relating to food vocabulary. With all of the food vocabulary, our pupils are exposed to café role play with questions and answers and can partake in a variety of short, rehearsed role plays.  

Mis pasatiempos 

With the start of our topic ‘mis pasatiempos,’ our pupils follow and attempt to read parts of the story Libro de deportes and extend their vocabulary based on sports. Our pupils can recall hobbies and saying them in both positive and negative affirmations. Our pupils begin to link hobbies with time expressions, saying which days of the week they complete their hobbies. Our pupils revisit opinions and express their opinions about their hobbies. Our pupils learn how to say the weather in Spanish and we push our pupils to create the links between the weather and their hobbies. Our pupils present a basic, rehearsed, weather report in Spanish.  

When it comes to assessing our pupils’ development in Spanish, we expect to see for their listening and speaking skills that they can listen and respond to simple rhymes, stories and songs. Our pupils are also able to recognise and respond to sound patterns, short sentences and can listen attentively and understand instructions. Our pupils can express simple likes and begin to express dislikes. Writing is a new skilled assessed in our Key Stage Two curriculum and is complimented with the development of reading skills. Our pupils can write two or three sentences on familiar topics with a model for support. Our pupils can make links between some phonemes, spellings and reading aloud and our pupils begin to experiment with writing of simple words from memory. In terms of grammar assessment, our pupils develop the use of verbs in the first person singular and use the correct verb dependent on the context. Our pupils can identify and understand gender of singular nouns and our pupils can state opinions.  

Year Four 

As we spend the first year of Junior teaching on revisiting and reteaching vocabulary to our Mayfield Infant pupils and our new pupils, when our pupils being their second year of Junior teaching in Year Four, our pupils are at the same level and we can continue their language acquisition.  

Similarly to Year Three, our pupils acquire their Spanish through three topics, each one broken down over a whole-term and this allows for our pupils to acquire, practice, and master the new vocabulary in Spanish. The topics are explained below.  

Mi familia 

When our pupils begin the topic of ‘mi familia’ they are introduced to vocabulary through the story “mi familia y yo” where our pupils can extend their vocabulary and recall a range of family members in Spanish. Our pupils then begin to physical describe family members with their eyes, hair and height. Adjectival agreement is reinforced with our pupils and they ensure to use the correct agreement dependent on the family member they are describing. Our pupils can create a written presentation about their family, either with a writing support or not. Our pupils revisit opinions and hobbies and begin to apply opinions and hobbies to members of their family.  

Mi panda lleva 

For the introduction of vocabulary, our pupils read and recall animals from the story “oso pardo.” For each of the animals from the story, our pupils can recall a range of habitats and use verbs in the third person singular to say where the animals live. Our pupils listen, follow and remember forms of clothing from the song and then link adjectival agreement rules to describe the colours of our clothes. Our pupils can link animals, clothing and habitats together and design and create outfits for their animals in Spanish.  

Estoy en forma 

When our pupils begin the topic of ‘estoy en forma,’ we recall previous vocabulary of food, drink, sports and hobbies from previous topics and from previous year groups. To develop the use of the vocabulary, our pupils can use verbs in the first, second and third person singular to describe eating habits and sporting activities. Our pupils can use the correct sports verb dependent on the activity. With all the healthy lifestyle vocabulary, our pupils can create and present healthy lifestyle advice in both spoken and written presentations.  

When it comes to assessing our pupils, for listening and speaking skills we expect that our pupils can memorise and present short-spoken texts, listen and say specific words and phrases, explore patterns and sounds of language, and ask and answer questions on several topics. In terms of assessing reading and writing skills, our pupils can write simple words and phrases using a model and can recall some words from memory. Our pupils can read and understand a range of familiar writing phrases, follow, listen and read short familiar texts and read some familiar words with accurate pronunciation. For assessing our pupils’ grammar skills, our pupils can use a range of verbs in the first, second and third person singular, using both positives and negatives and develop their awareness and application of gender adjectival agreement.  

Year Five 

By the time our pupils reach Year Five, they have used many techniques to acquire Spanish and we continue with this learning in Year Five. Our pupils are set more challenges and we know our pupils are resilient and can achieve them.  

As with the previous year groups, our pupils acquire their Spanish through three topics, each one broken down over a whole-term and this allows for our pupils to acquire, practice, and master the new vocabulary in Spanish. The topics are explained below. 

Mi rutina diaria 

Our pupils begin this topic of daily routine by reading as a class and individually the story “No me quiero ir a la cama,” where our pupils are exposed to new vocabulary relating to the daily routine. Our pupils can use daily routine verbs in the present tense and can understand and apply rules with regular AR verbs in the present tense conjugations. To compliment the daily routine expressions, our pupils learn how to tell the time in Spanish. With all this information, our pupils can prepare and present a short presentation about their daily routine and use times. Our pupils can reflect on their previous Spanish learning and can use conjunctions, opinions and negatives about their daily routine.  

Mi barrio 

As a usual piece of new topic, our pupils begin this topic by following the song “mi barrio” and by reading as a class and individually “última parade de la calle.” Our pupils acquire vocabulary relating to their neighbourhood and can use verbs of location and what there is in their neighbourhood. Our pupils can use specific adjectives to describe facilities in their neighbourhood, ensuring there is correct adjectival agreement. Our pupils reuse opinions and negatives about their neighbourhood. Our pupils revisit regular AR verbs in the present tense conjugations and can link this with recycling and actions needed to support the environment.  

Mi dieta 

To start this topic, our pupils read a story they might be familiar with “la oruga muy hambrienta.” Our pupils have already visited food and drink vocabulary in Year Three and Year Four so our pupils develop their vocabulary of food and drink, along with more interesting adjectives. As our pupils have used AR regular present tense conjugations, our pupils apply their conjugation knowledge to ER regular present tense verbs relating to meals. Our pupils are pushed to compare the present and preterite tense conjugations of ER verbs relating to food on the first, second and third singular conjugation. With all the vocabulary, our pupils create, write and share a presentation to explain a diet in two tenses and perform to an audience.  

When it comes to assessing our pupils progress in Year Five, for listening and speaking skills, our pupils can prepare and practise simple conversations, reusing familiar vocabulary and structures in new contexts. Our pupils listen attentively and understand more complex phrases and sentences, using a simple conjunction and our pupils can prepare short presentations on familiar topics with opinions expressed. For reading and writing skills, our pupils can write more interesting sentences by adding in conjunctions, re-read a variety of short texts with growing accuracy and write words, phrases and short sentences with references. In terms of grammar skills, our pupils can explain conjugations of AR and ER verbs, along with being able to conjugate confidently to first, second and third person singular.  

Year Six 

As our pupils reach their final year of primary language acquisition, in Year Six we push our pupils to revisit knowledge and skills they have acquired and add in extra details, in preparation of their transition to secondary school.  

As with all previous year groups, our pupils acquire their Spanish through three topics, each one broken down over a whole-term and this allows for our pupils to acquire, practice, and master the new vocabulary in Spanish. The topics are explained below. 

Mis vacaciones pasadas 

Our pupils begin by independently reading the story “lo que escuchó la mariquita en vacaciones” where our pupils acquire and share new vocabulary with their class. As this topic is referring to past holidays, our pupils develop their conjugation knowledge and know how two irregular verbs are conjugated into the preterite tense, especially for first, second and third singular person. Our pupils link their vocabulary of past holidays to a range of countries, including Spanish speaking ones. Our pupils can describe a range of transports and add preferences. Our pupils can describe past weather expressions. With all this vocabulary, our pupils can write a personal diary entry of a previous holiday and share this with an audience.  

Mi escuela ideal 

Our pupils begin by singing along independently to the song “las asignaturas” and pick out new vocabulary. Our pupils can apply their grammar knowledge and conjugate a school verb into the present tense and can describe a school timetable. Our pupils revisit opinions and can use a range of adjective and opinions to share information about subjects and facilities. Our pupils can use conditional ideas to describe their future school aspirations. With all this vocabulary, our pupils can create a short presentation with the vision of their future school and what they would like for it contain or not.  

Mi futuro 

As this is our pupils’ final term with primary Spanish, we want to think about our futures. Our pupils begin by reading “cuando sea mayor, quiero ser…” and share new vocabulary of jobs and professions with their class. Our pupils can describe a range of professions in masculine, feminine, singular and plural and can use the conditional tense to describe future jobs and aspirations. Our pupils can conjugate into the near future tense and use first and third person singular. With all of this information, our pupils write a letter to their future Spanish teacher using the near future and conditional ideas.  

To assess our pupils’ progress in Year Six, for listening and speaking, our pupils understand and use ideas in different tense. Our pupils can use spoken language confidently to hold a conversation and express opinions. Our pupils can understand and use more complex phrases and sentences with confidence in Spanish. With regards to reading and writing skills, our pupils can write sentences on a range of topics using references to support. Our pupils can identify and create different text types and our pupils can read and understand main points and details of passages. In terms of assessing our pupils’ grammar skills, our pupils can conjugate key irregular verbs into the preterite tense. Our pupils can use conditional and future ideas, mainly talking in first person singular.  

There is a National Curriculum expectation of teaching Languages to pupils at Key Stage Three. The curriculum objectives, themes and assessment have been paired with the National Curriculum objectives and offer our pupils the development needed for their language acquisition in Spanish. Similarly to our Key Stage One and Key Stage Two curriculum, our curriculum is shaped with ‘I can’ objectives so pupils can see what they are capable of doing and what will be coming next in their learning. Our curriculum and vocabulary acquisition are complimented with a knowledge organiser for each term’s topic to encourage our pupils to be resourceful and resilient with their Spanish learning. 

Year Seven 

When our pupils join us in Year Seven, we have pupils who have learnt Spanish, French, German or another language in their primary school. For our Mayfield Primary pupils, they have been exposed to Spanish lessons and they will have a mixture of retrieving previous learning and also learning new skills. Our Mayfield Primary pupils will take the lead and support our new pupils and we aim to ensure all pupils are on the same par with their language acquisition.  

As we do for the Key Stage One and Two curriculum, our pupils are taught three topics over the three whole-terms. Our Year Seven pupils follow the below plans: 

Todo sobre mi vida 

This is our first topic for our Year Seven pupils and it is all about sharing personal information in Spanish. Our pupils begin by breaking down Spanish phonics and practising their pronunciation and spelling. Our pupils regularly speak in class and our pupils can greet someone in Spanish and converse verbally and written basic details of oneself. Our pupils can introduce and present key information about their family and friends and understand and apply regular adjectival agreement with nouns. Our pupils can express their own opinions and begin to add simple justification to them. Our pupils have the opportunity to expand opinions by asking questions and stating others’ opinions. Our pupils can explain activities that they and other people complete by understanding how to conjugate regular verbs into the present tense on all pronouns. Our pupils can hold a basic question and answer role play and provide a basic description of a photo. As this is the first term of Spanish learning for some of our pupils, we regularly make links to the Spanish speaking world and culture so our pupils can appreciate and understand the links to their own learning.  

Mi insti 

Our pupils continue with their knowledge of regular present tense conjugation on all pronouns and can identify and use key verbs that are expressed in the imperfect, present and simple future tense to describe facilities and timetable at school. Some of our pupils can retrieve knowledge of vocabulary about school timetable with days and time and our new pupils will be exposed to this new vocabulary. Our pupils can use adjectives and a complex structure, with comparatives, to describe their teacher. Our pupils can describe their school uniform by using adjectives and more specific clothing adjectives. Our pupils can expand their school uniform description by using conditional tense ideas. Our pupils can share information and opinions about school clubs. Our pupils' writing is becoming more spontaneous and they can create a 40-50-word piece of writing using bullet point starters.  

Mis vacaciones  

As our pupils have focused on present tense conjugations in the previous term, our pupils develop their conjugation knowledge and can conjugate and use key sport verbs in the present tense. Our pupils can use the correct sport verb with the sport. Our pupils can identify and recall weather expressions and then can use subordinate clauses to link sports and weather. Our pupils develop their grammar knowledge further by being able to conjugate and apply the near future tense relating to future holidays and activities. Our pupils can describe how to travel on holiday and can describe a range of holiday accommodation and facilities. Our pupils begin to conjugate key verbs into the preterite tense to express where and when they went on a past holiday. Our pupils can create a one-minute presentation with regards to leisure and holiday activities. As our pupils have been learning about holidays and travel, our pupils finish this topic by completing a research project on a Spanish speaking country and can create a fact file.  

Our pupils are assessed via two strands: listening and speaking skills and reading and writing skills. The descriptors of how our pupils are assessed via listening and speaking are that our pupils can understand and communicate opinions and say familiar words and short phrases. Our pupils can understand and answer questions with preparation and our pupils understand examples of two different timeframes. Our pupils can understand, share and justify opinions, not just their own opinions but others’ too. With regards to pronunciation, our pupils can identify a range of phonemes and speak with understandable pronunciation. The descriptors how our pupils are assessed via reading and writing are that our pupils can read, adapt and complete short phrases with support. Our pupils can translate familiar language. Our pupils can use correct word order with agreements of nouns and adjectives. Similarly to listening and speaking, our pupils can understand, share and justify opinions, not just their own opinions but others’ too and our pupils can understand texts of two different timeframes and write in two timeframes. 

Year Eight 

Our pupils are in their second year of secondary Spanish learning and our pupils have developed a strong foundation from their Year Seven learning. In Year Eight, we develop previously taught skills and we introduce new skills and vocabulary to our pupils.   

As we do for the Key Stage One and Two curriculum, our pupils are taught three topics over the three whole-terms. Our Year Eight pupils follow the below plans: 

En mi barrio 

Our first topic in Year Eight looks at neighbourhood, both our own neighbourhood and linking to neighbourhoods of the cities in the Spanish speaking world. Our pupils can physically describe the location of where the neighbourhood is. Our pupils can describe the facilities in the neighbourhood and link with the conditional tense of what our pupils would like to see or would do to improve the neighbourhood. Our pupils look at describing where they live with a mapped-out layout of rooms and once again, our pupils can use the conditional tense of describing their ideal house. Our pupils can conjugate verbs into the imperfect tense and explain environmental problems in the past. Our pupils can contrast and compare about environmental problems in the imperfect and present tense. Our pupils can use modal verbs in the present and conditional tenses to recommend environmental solutions. Our pupils can describe a photo covering people, location and weather areas with detail.  

Tienes que llevar una vida sana 

Our pupils are introduced to a new type of verb, reflexive verbs. Our pupils can conjugate reflexive verbs with the present and imperfect tense to describe their daily routine and others’ routine too. Our pupils retrieve information on how to use hours and minutes in Spanish and can add this extra information to their daily routines. Our pupils retrieve how to conjugate key sport verbs into the imperfect and present and learn how to conjugate into the near future tense. Our pupils link the verbs with sports and can share information, both verbally and written, about their sporting habits. Our pupils learn healthy and unhealthy lifestyle choices and then can compare lifestyle choices when they were younger, now and when they will be older. Our pupils retrieve the use of modal verbs and can use modal verbs in the present and conditional tenses to recommend healthy and unhealthy choices. Our pupils can create dialogues in the situation of being in a restaurant and link to healthy and unhealthy lifestyle choices.  

La vida tecnologica  

For our final topic in Year Eight, our pupils are linking their Spanish learning to a technological life. Our pupils can describe the uses of a mobile phone and the activities they do on their phones. Our pupils can develop and describe an ideal phone using the conditional tense. Our pupils can express justified plural opinions of a variety of television shows and our pupils can retrieve the use of comparatives and can express their preferences about television shows. Our pupils can retrieve the use of the near future tense to talk about films and going to the cinema. Our pupils can use the preterite tense to talk about celebrating a special occasion.  

Our pupils are assessed via two strands: listening and speaking skills and reading and writing skills. The descriptors of how our pupils are assessed via listening and speaking are that our pupils can understand and dictate and transcribe with some minor errors, developed with the understanding and ability to ask questions which have been prepared. Our pupils develop the use of different timeframes and are looking at identifying and using three different timeframes and growing accuracy between two. With regards to assessing our pupils for reading and writing skills, our pupils can translate mostly familiar language into the target language and understand new words with context and cognates. Our pupils develop the use of different timeframes and are looking at identifying and using three different timeframes and growing accuracy between two. 

Year Nine 

Year Nine is the third and final year of Key Stage Three learning for our pupils. We are developing the use of skills taught from previous years and applying them to different topics. This way, it allows for our pupils to see their uses in one more than just one context.  

As we do for the Key Stage One and Two curriculum, our pupils are taught three topics over the three whole-terms. Our Year Nine pupils follow the below plans: 

Mis vacaciones pasadas 

Our pupils begin Year Nine with the topic of holidays. Our pupils can conjugate regular and some irregular verbs into the preterite tense for activities on holiday. Our pupils are expected to vary the difference of pronouns so they can talk about other people’s activities too. Our pupils can compare activities in the preterite and present tense together. Our pupils can describe transportation and can use comparatives as a justification. Our pupils can use opinions in the preterite and a greater variety of opinions to describe the good, bad, best and worst things of their holidays. Our pupils can retrieve information on weather expressions and can use them in the preterite tense. With the weather expressions and activities, our pupils can use subordinate clauses linking weather and activities in the preterite and present tense. Our pupils can use key ideas in the imperfect tense to describe accommodation and facilities. Our pupils can partake in a dialogue to book accommodation along with problems. Our pupils can use the near future tense to describe future holiday plans.  

El mundo laboral  

Our pupils use this topic to boost their future aspirations and wishes. Our pupils can describe a variety of jobs and professions done by oneself and others. Our pupils can link roles and responsibilities with jobs and professions. Our pupils can give opinions and justification about jobs and roles. Our pupils can express future ideas of what they will be like in their future and what jobs they will be doing. Our pupils can use the conditional tense to share what jobs oneself and others would do in the future. Our pupils have to think about work experience and pretend they have completed their experience. Our pupils can use the preterite and imperfect tenses to describe a work experience placement. Our pupils finish this topic by sharing thoughts about feelings about the importance of learning an international language.  

¡Vamos a celebrar una fiesta! followed by Grammar boot-camp. 

This is the final topic for our Year Nine pupils, so we split the term’s topic to celebrate a festival and then reinforce all grammar knowledge with the grammar boot-camp.  

For our festival topic, our pupils can describe typical food of Spanish-speaking countries and then draw comparisons with British cuisine. Our pupils can compare festivals held in Spanish-speaking countries and highlight differences with British celebrations. Our pupils can use reflexive verbs in the preterite and present tense to describe how a special day goes. Our pupils can maintain a conversation in Spanish to talk about a music festival.  

Once we have finished the celebration part of the topic, we turn our attention to the grammar boot-camp. Our pupils can retrieve how to conjugate and apply regular and key irregular verbs into the imperfect, preterite, present, near future, simple future and conditional tenses. Our pupils retrieve how to express opinions and justifications. Our pupils can retrieve and apply complex structures that have been taught over the past three years.  

Our pupils are assessed via two strands: listening and speaking skills and reading and writing skills. The descriptors of how our pupils are assessed via listening and speaking are that our pupils can understand and produce longer statements with spontaneity and understand explains in three tenses and mostly accurate with their application into the three tenses. Our pupils can understand and respond mostly accurately in the target language and can understand the meaning of new words in context and speak with accurate pronunciation. For reading and writing skills, our pupils can understand and manipulate a variety of grammatical structures and patters, with three different timeframes and some accuracy with the three tenses. Our pupils can understand and produce longer texts with spontaneity and are able to translate most of short passages into target language with minor errors.  

Spanish 

Our pupils follow the Edexcel GCSE Spanish (1-9) so the intent matches the elements from the examination specification.  

There are five themes that are covered by the Edexcel GCSE specification and these areas are taught, blended and retrieved throughout Year Ten and Year Eleven lessons. Our homework compliments the spacing out of topics and pupils have set ‘I can’ statements to revise from.  

Identity and Culture 

Our pupils begin to answer, ‘Who am I?’ where pupils learn about relationships, explaining events when they were younger, what their friends and family are like. Our pupils can explain what makes a good friend, their social interests, activities and what makes a good role model. Our pupils develop their understanding of Identity and Culture with ‘Daily life’ where pupils learn about customs and everyday life, food and drink, shopping, social media, and advantages and disadvantages, along with the use of, social media. Our pupils finish their understanding of Identity and Culture with ‘Cultural life’ where pupils learn about celebrations and festivals, reading, music, sport, film and television.  

Local area, Holiday, and Travel 

Our pupils being to learn about, ‘Holidays’ with explaining preferences, experiences and destinations. Our pupils develop to learn about ‘Travel and tourist transactions’ where pupils can describe travel and accommodation, asking for help and dealing with problems, direction, eating out and shopping. Our pupils finish this theme by learning about ‘Town, region and country,’ where pupils link weather, places to see and things to do.  

School 

A popular theme our pupils like to complete is ‘School’ where pupils begin by learning ‘What school is like.’ Here, our pupils can learn and describe school types, school day, subjects, rules and pressures and celebrating success. Our pupils also learn about ‘School activities’ with school trips, events and exchanges.  

Future aspirations, Study and Work 

Our pupils are encouraged to think about their futures with this theme. Our pupils begin with ‘Using languages beyond the classroom’ where our pupils learn about forming relationships, travel and employment. We encourage our pupils to think about their ‘Ambitions’ with links to further study, volunteering and training. On a final note, our pupils learn about ‘Work’ where our pupils link jobs, careers and professions.  

International and Global Dimensions  

The final theme sees our pupils learn about ‘Bringing the world together’ which links to sports events, music events, campaigns and good causes. We develop our skills and learn ‘Environmental issues’ with links to being green and access to natural resources.  

Grammar 

There is an extensive list of grammatical terms for our pupils to learn in Key Stage Four Spanish and these are blended into each of the five themes from above. For Foundation tier, our pupils can; understand and explain the process of conjugation, can explain how many lines there are to a conjugated verb and whom they refer to, can conjugate regular verbs into the present tense, can conjugate irregular verbs into the present tense, can recognise and conjugate stem changing verbs into the present tense, can use present tense time phrases, can identify reflexive verbs into the present, preterite and future tenses,  can conjugate regular verbs into the preterite tense, can conjugate irregular verbs into the preterite tense,  can use preterite tense time phrases,  can conjugate verbs into the near future tense,  can use near future tense time phrases,  can identify verbs into the present continuous tense and identify irregulars,  can conjugate verbs into the imperfect tense and identify irregulars,  can identify imperfect tense time phrases, can use the imperative form of verbs to give instructions,  can use modal verbs, can use conditional opinions with me gustaría, can use adverbs of frequency to say how often something happens, can use a variety of opinion phrases,  can use a variety of justifications for opinions,  can use J.O.E, can understand when to you SER and ESTAR,  can understand when to use a SABER and CONOCER,  can describe what I have to do you using TENER QUE + infinitive, can describe what I usually do using SOLER + infinitive,  can use DESDE HACE + present tense to say how long I have been doing something,  can say what I feel like doing using TENER GANAS DE + infinitive,  can agree adjectives based on masculine, feminine, singular, plural,  can use the correct indefinite article,  can use the correct definite article,  can use a variety of negatives, can use a variety of conjunctions, can use comparatives, can use exclamations,  can use qualifiers, can use time sequences, can use question words to ask a variety of questions, can aim to use a difference of three-to-four tenses, showing use in the past, present and future and can use time, hours and minutes.  

For Higher tier, our pupils can; conjugate reflexive verbs,  can conjugate verbs into the present continuous tense,  can conjugate verbs into the perfect tense,  can use perfect tense time phrases, can conjugate verbs into the imperfect tense,  can conjugate verbs into the imperfect continuous tense, can use imperfect tense time phrases, can conjugate verbs into the simple future, can use future tense time phrases,  can conjugate verbs into the conditional tense, can use conditional tense time phrases, can conjugate verbs into the pluperfect tense, can use pluperfect tense time phrases,  can conjugate verbs into the present subjunctive, can use subordinate clauses with cuando, can use si structures,  can use imperfect subjunctive to describe what I would do,  can use the passive to say what is was will be done by someone or something, can avoid the passive by using reflexive pronoun se, can use ACABAR DE + infinitive to describe what I have just done,  can use DESDE HACE + imperfect tense, can use a Direct Object Pronouns to avoid repetition, can use Indirect Object Pronouns to say who the action is happening to, can use possessive adjectives,  can use demonstrative adjectives,  can say what I have done already using YA + perfect tense, can say what I no longer do using YA NO + present tense, can say what I still do using TODAVIA + present tense, can say what I have not done yet using TODAVIA + perfect tense, can use superlatives, can use absolute superlatives, can use a variety of expressions followed by the infinitive, can use a variety of complex conjunctions, can use se debería + infinitive, can use more complex opinions, can use more complex justifications and can use idioms. 

French  

Our pupils follow the Edexcel GCSE French (1-9) so the intent matches the elements from the examination specification.  

There are five themes that are covered by the Edexcel GCSE specification and these areas are taught, blended and retrieved throughout Year Ten and Year Eleven lessons. Our homework compliments the spacing out of topics and pupils have set ‘I can’ statements to revise from.  

Identity and Culture 

Our pupils begin to answer, ‘Who am I?’ where pupils learn about relationships, explaining events when they were younger, what their friends and family are like. Our pupils can explain what makes a good friend, their social interests, activities and what makes a good role model. Our pupils develop their understanding of Identity and Culture with ‘Daily life’ where pupils learn about customs and everyday life, food and drink, shopping, social media, and advantages and disadvantages, along with the use of, social media. Our pupils finish their understanding of Identity and Culture with ‘Cultural life’ where pupils learn about celebrations and festivals, reading, music, sport, film and television.  

Local area, Holiday, and Travel 

Our pupils being to learn about, ‘Holidays’ with explaining preferences, experiences and destinations. Our pupils develop to learn about ‘Travel and tourist transactions’ where pupils can describe travel and accommodation, asking for help and dealing with problems, direction, eating out and shopping. Our pupils finish this theme by learning about ‘Town, region and country,’ where pupils link weather, places to see and things to do.  

School 

A popular theme our pupils like to complete is ‘School’ where pupils begin by learning ‘What school is like.’ Here, our pupils can learn and describe school types, school day, subjects, rules and pressures and celebrating success. Our pupils also learn about ‘School activities’ with school trips, events and exchanges.  

Future aspirations, Study and Work 

Our pupils are encouraged to think about their futures with this theme. Our pupils begin with ‘Using languages beyond the classroom’ where our pupils learn about forming relationships, travel and employment. We encourage our pupils to think about their ‘Ambitions’ with links to further study, volunteering and training. On a final note, our pupils learn about ‘Work’ where our pupils link jobs, careers and professions.  

International and Global Dimensions  

The final theme sees our pupils learn about ‘Bringing the world together’ which links to sports events, music events, campaigns and good causes. We develop our skills and learn ‘Environmental issues’ with links to being green and access to natural resources.  

Grammar 

There is an extensive list of grammatical terms for our pupils to learn in Key Stage Four French and these are blended into each of the five themes from above. For Foundation tier, our pupils can; understand and explain the process of conjugation,  can explain how many lines there are to a conjugated verb and whom they refer to, can conjugate regular verbs into the present tense, can conjugate irregular verbs into the present tense, can use present tense time phrases,  can identify reflexive verbs into the present, perfect and future tenses,  can conjugate regular verbs with into the perfect tense with avoir,  can conjugate irregular verbs into the perfect tense with avoir,  can conjugate regular verbs into the perfect tense with être, can conjugate irregular verbs into the perfect tense with être,  can use perfect tense time phrases, can conjugate verbs into the near future tense, can use near future tense time phrases, can conjugate verbs avoir, être and faire into the imperfect tense and identify other verbs, can identify imperfect tense time phrases, can use the imperative form of verbs to give instructions, can use modal verbs, can use conditional opinions with vouloir and aimer, can use adverbs of frequency to say how often something happens, can use a variety of opinion phrases, can use a variety of justifications for opinions, can use J.O.E, can describe what I have to do you using DEVOIR + infinitive,  can use DEPUIS + present tense to say how long I have been doing something, can agree adjectives based on masculine, feminine, singular, plural, can use the correct indefinite article, can use the correct definite article,  can use a variety of negatives,  can use a variety of conjunctions, can use comparatives, can use exclamations, can use qualifiers, can use time sequences,  can use question words to ask a variety of questions,  can aim to use a difference of three-to-four tenses, showing use in the past, present and future and can use time, hours and minutes. 

For Higher tier, our pupils can; conjugate and use reflexive verbs, can conjugate verbs into the imperfect tense, can use imperfect tense time phrases, can conjugate verbs into the simple future, can use future tense time phrases, can conjugate verbs into the conditional tense, can use conditional tense time phrases, can conjugate verbs into the pluperfect tense, can use pluperfect tense time phrases, can conjugate verbs into the present subjunctive, can use si structures, can use the passive to say what is was will be done by someone or something, can use DEPUIS + imperfect tense, can use a Direct Object Pronouns to avoid repetition, can use Indirect Object Pronouns to say who the action is happening to, can use possessive adjectives, can use demonstrative adjectives, can use superlatives, can use absolute superlatives, can use a variety of expressions followed by the infinitive,  can use a variety of complex conjunctions,  can use more complex opinions,  can use more complex justifications, can use idioms, can use pronouns y and en and can use VENIR DE + infinitive to say what I have just done. 

Welcome to Humanities.  Here you will find information about History, Geography, RE, Travel and Tourism and PSHE.

Our History vision at Mayfield school from KS1 through to KS4 is to raise student's curiosity of the past and to enable them to gain a sound understanding of Britian’s past and that of the wider world. Children have opportunities to investigate and interpret the past building their understanding of chronology.  Our pupils have the following characteristics based on our learning 6Rs and superpowers.  

Ready – We have ability to think critically about history and communicate ideas confidently to a range of audiences.  

Resilient – We embrace challenging activities, including opportunities to undertake high-quality research across a range of history topics.  

Reflective – We are curious about the past and how and why people interpret the past in different ways. We have the ability to think, reflect, debate, discuss and evaluate the past by formulating and refining questions and lines of enquiry.  

Respectful - We have respect for historical evidence and the ability to make critical use of it to support our learning. We support, evaluate and challenge our own and others’ views using historical evidence from a range of sources.  

Resourceful – We acquire knowledge and understanding of people, events and contexts from a range of historical periods. 

At KS1 and 2 History is linked to topics which allow a broad understanding for the children and allow them to develop their expertise. Our 3-year KS3 curriculum builds on the skills and knowledge gained at KS1 &2 and offers a broad chronological understanding of past societies. We aim to equip students with the ability to understand the complexity of people's lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups. In addition, we aim to help students to understand the present existing social, political, religious and economic conditions of the people. We recognise ourselves to be an innovative and forward-thinking department constantly seeking to develop new approaches to teaching and learning to enable history to stay at the forefront of new teaching approaches. We place high value on taking History away from the classroom and where possible we seek opportunities for trips to places of historical interest. Regular trips include visits to Beaulieu and Buster Farm (Infants/Junior) and Portchester Castle and the Imperial War Musuem (Senior). Once every two years we also endeavour to take students on a European residential trip and past trips have included WWI Battlefields, Berlin and Auschwitz  concentration camps. The History department are a strong supportive team committed to enabling pupils to achieve the best grades possible during their time in Mayfield. The History team at Mayfield are proud of our sustained attainment at both key stage three and key stage four.  

  • Develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time;

  • Know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods;  

  • Use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events;  

  • Understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented.  

Pupils should be taught about: 

  • Changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life; 

  • Events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally [for example, the Great Fire of London, the first aeroplane flight or events commemorated through festivals or anniversaries] (Year 1 Great fire of London. Year 2, Titanic); 

  • The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods [for example, Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong, William Caxton and Tim Berners-Lee, Pieter Bruegel the Elder and LS Lowry, Rosa Parks and Emily Davison, Mary Seacole and/or Florence Nightingale and Edith Cavell]  (Year 1 Admiral Lord Nelson, Year 2, Queen Elizabeth); 

  •  Significant historical events, people and places in their own locality.

  • Develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study. 

  • Note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms.  

  • Regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. 

  • Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.  

Pupils should be taught about: 

  • Changes in Britain from the stone age to the iron age (year 3) 

  • The roman empire and its impact on Britain (year 3) 

  • Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and scots (year 4) 

  • The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor (year 4) 

  • A local history study (year 4) 

  • A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066 

  • The achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of one of the following: ancient summer; the Indus Valley; Ancient Egypt; The Shang Dynasty of Ancient China (Ancient Egypt – year 5) 

  • Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world (year 6) 

  • A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history – one study chosen from: early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300 (TBC – year 6) 

Aims 

  • Know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative;  

  • Know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world;  

  • Gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry'; 

  • Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance;  

  • Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed; 

  • Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales. 

Content 

  • The development of Church, state and society in Medieval Britain 1066-1509 (Mayfield= Norman conquest, Feudalism, Magna Carta, Black Death Crusades and Becket-power struggle between church-state); 

  • The development of Church, state and society in Britain 1509-1745 - specifically, reformation and counter-reformation, Elizabeth’s religious settlement, Civil Wars and Cromwell, Renaissance & medicine; 

  • Ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain, 1745-1901 - specifically, Britain’s salve Trade, the social, economic and political impact of the Industrial Revolution, the extension of the franchise, Britain’s Empire and case study of India; 

  • Challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901-present day - specifically, women’s suffrage, Liberal reforms, WWI, dictators, WWII, the Holocaust & post-war Britain;

  • A local history study – Portchester Castle, asking the question: is it a typical Norman castle? 

The GCSE History content comprises the following elements: 

• one period study (either America or Germany);  

• one thematic study; 

• one wider world depth study; 

• one British depth study including the historic environment.

Section A Period Study (Option 1): America 

 

Expansion: opportunities and challenges 

The geography of North America: attitudes to the Great American Desert; the belief in ‘Manifest Destiny’. 

• Why the early settlers went west and the challenges they faced: Brigham Young and the Mormons; the pioneer migrant farmers, the journey west; the miners. 

• Dealing with a different culture: the Plains Indians’ way of life; early American Government policy towards the Plains Indians; the Permanent Indian Frontier; a changing relationship with the Plains Indians. 

 

Conflict across America 

• Increasing conflict on the Plains: the Fort Laramie Treaty (1851) and the failure of the policy of concentration; the Indian Wars (1862–1867): reasons for and consequences of the Wars; Sand Creek Massacre; Fetterman's Trap. 

• The background to the American Civil War: differences between North and South, issues of slavery, westward expansion and free states abolitionism; breakdown of the Missouri Compromise, John Brown, the roles of Lincoln and Jefferson Davis; the social and economic impact of the American Civil War on civilian populations. 

• Coming to terms with the Mormons: the Mountain Meadow Massacre and its aftermath 

Consolidation: forging the nation 

• The aftermath of the American Civil War: the 13th Amendment; Civil Rights Act; reconstruction in the South, 1866–1877; carpetbaggers; the balance of Federal and State powers. 

• The continued settlement of the west: the Homesteaders, reasons for going west; government actions and laws; land and railroads; farming problems and solutions. 

• The resolution of ‘the Indian problem’ after 1865: the small reservations policy; attitudes to the native Americans; Battle of the Little Big Horn; The Dawes Act; Battle of Wounded Knee; the closing of the frontier and its impact on native Americans. 

Section A Period Study (Option 2): Germany

Germany and the growth of democracy 

• Kaiser Wilhelm and the difficulties of ruling Germany: the growth of parliamentary government; the influence of Prussian militarism; industrialisation; social reform and the growth of socialism; the domestic importance of the Navy Laws. 

• Impact of the First World War: war weariness, economic problems; defeat; the end of the monarchy; post-war problems including reparations, the occupation of the Ruhr and hyperinflation. 

• Weimar democracy: political change and unrest, 1919–1923, including Spartacists, Kapp Putsch and the Munich Putsch; the extent of recovery during the Stresemann era (1924–1929): economic developments including the new currency, Dawes Plan and the Young Plan; the impact of international agreements on recovery; Weimar culture. 

Germany and the Depression 

• The impact of the Depression: growth in support for the Nazis and other extremist parties (1928–1932), including the role of the SA; Hitler’s appeal. 

• The failure of Weimar democracy: election results; the role of Papen and Hindenburg and Hitler’s appointment as Chancellor. 

• The establishment of Hitler’s dictatorship: the Reichstag Fire; the Enabling Act; elimination of political opposition; trade unions; Rohm and the Night of the Long Knives; Hitler becomes Führer. 

The experiences of Germans under the Nazis 

• Economic changes: benefits and drawbacks; employment; public works programmes; rearmament; self-sufficiency; the impact of war on the economy and the German people, including bombing, rationing, labour shortages, refugees. 

• Social policy and practice: reasons for policies, practices and their impact on women, young people and youth groups; education; control of churches and religion; Aryan ideas, racial policy and persecution; the Final Solution. 

• Control: Goebbels, the use of propaganda and censorship; Nazi culture; repression and the police state and the roles of Himmler, the SS and Gestapo; opposition and resistance, including White Rose group, Swing Youth, Edelweiss Pirates and July 1944 bomb plot. 

Understanding the Modern World

Section B: Wider World Depth Study:  Conflict and Tension- The First World War  1894-1918 

 

The causes of the First World War 

• The Alliance System: the Triple Alliance; Franco-Russian Alliance; relations between the ‘Entente’ powers; the crises in Morocco (1905 and 1911) and the Balkans (1908–1909), and their effects on international relations. 

• Anglo-German rivalry: Britain and challenges to Splendid Isolation; Kaiser Wilhelm’s aims in foreign policy, including Weltpolitik; colonial tensions; European rearmament, including the Anglo-German naval race. 

• Outbreak of war: Slav nationalism and relations between Serbia and Austria-Hungary; the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo and its consequences; the July Crisis; the Schlieffen Plan and Belgium; reasons for the outbreak of hostilities and the escalation of the conflict. 

The First World War: stalemate 

• The Schlieffen Plan: the reasons for the plan, its failure, including the Battle of Marne and its contribution to the stalemate. 

• The Western Front: military tactics and technology, including trench warfare; the war of attrition; key battles, including Verdun, the Somme and Passchendaele, the reasons for, the events and significance of these battles. 

• The wider war: the war on other fronts; Gallipoli and its failure; the events and significance of the war at sea, including Jutland, the U-Boat campaign and convoys. 

Ending the war 

• Changes in the Allied Forces: consequences of the Bolshevik Revolution and the withdrawal of Russia on Germany strategy; the reasons for and impact of the entry of the USA into the war. 

• Military developments in 1918 and their contribution to Germany’s defeat: the evolution of tactics and technology; Ludendorff the German Spring Offensive; the Allied advance during The Hundred Days. 

• Germany surrenders, the impact of the blockade; abdication of the Kaiser; armistice; the contribution of Haig and Foch to Germany’s defeat. 

Shaping the Nation

Section A: Thematic studies:  Britain: Health and the People 1000 to the Present Day 

Medicine stands still 

• Medieval medicine: approaches including natural, supernatural, ideas of Hippocratic and Galenic methods and treatments; the medieval doctor; training, beliefs about cause of illness. 

• Medical progress: the contribution of Christianity to medical progress and treatment; hospitals; the nature and importance of Islamic medicine and surgery; surgery in medieval times, ideas and techniques. 

• Public health in the Middle Ages: towns and monasteries; the Black Death in Britain, beliefs about its causes, treatment and prevention. 

The beginnings of change 

• The impact of the Renaissance on Britain: challenge to medical authority in anatomy, physiology and surgery; the work of Vesalius, Paré, William Harvey; opposition to change. 

• Dealing with disease: traditional and new methods of treatments; quackery; methods of treating disease; plague; the growth of hospitals; changes to the training and status of surgeons and physicians; the work of John Hunter. 

• Prevention of disease: inoculation; Edward Jenner, vaccination and opposition to change. 

A revolution in medicine 

• The development of Germ Theory and its impact on the treatment of disease in Britain: the importance of Pasteur, Robert Koch and microbe hunting; Pasteur and vaccination; Paul Ehrlich and magic bullets; everyday medical treatments and remedies. 

• A revolution in surgery: anaesthetics, including Simpson and chloroform; antiseptics, including Lister and carbolic acid; surgical procedures; aseptic surgery. 

• Improvements in public health: public health problems in industrial Britain; cholera epidemics; the role of public health reformers; local and national government involvement in public health improvement, including the 1848 and 1875 Public Health Acts. 

Modern medicine 

• Modern treatment of disease: the development of the pharmaceutical industry; penicillin, its discovery by Fleming, its development; new diseases and treatments, antibiotic resistance; alternative treatments. 

• The impact of war and technology on surgery: plastic surgery; blood transfusions; X-rays; transplant surgery; modern surgical methods, including lasers, radiation therapy and keyhole surgery. 

• Modern public health: the importance of Booth, Rowntree, and the Boer War; the Liberal social reforms; the impact of two world wars on public health, poverty and housing; the Beveridge Report and the Welfare State; creation and development of the National Health Service; costs, choices and the issues of healthcare in the 21st century. 

Section B British depth studies including the historic environment: Elizabethan England 1568-1603

 

 Elizabeth's court and Parliament 

• Elizabeth I and her court: background and character of Elizabeth I; court life, including patronage; key ministers. 

• The difficulties of a female ruler: relations with Parliament; the problem of marriage and the succession; the strength of Elizabeth’s authority at the end of her reign, including Essex’s rebellion in 1601. 

Life in Elizabethan times 

• A ‘Golden Age’: living standards and fashions; growing prosperity and the rise of the gentry; the Elizabethan theatre and its achievements; attitudes to the theatre. 

• The poor: reasons for the increase in poverty; attitudes and responses to poverty; the reasons for government action and the seriousness of the problem. 

• English sailors: Hawkins and Drake; circumnavigation 1577–1580, voyages and trade; the role of Raleigh

 

• A ‘Golden Age’: living standards and fashions; growing prosperity and the rise of the gentry; the Elizabethan theatre and its achievements; attitudes to the theatre. 

• The poor: reasons for the increase in poverty; attitudes and responses to poverty; the reasons for government action and the seriousness of the problem. 

• English sailors: Hawkins and Drake; circumnavigation 1577–1580, voyages and trade; the role of Raleigh.

Troubles at home and abroad 

• Religious matters: the question of religion, English Catholicism and Protestantism; the Northern Rebellion; Elizabeth's excommunication; the missionaries; Catholic plots and the threat to the Elizabethan settlement; the nature and ideas of the Puritans and Puritanism; Elizabeth and her government's responses and policies towards religious matters. 

• Mary Queen of Scots: background; Elizabeth and Parliament’s treatment of Mary; the challenge posed by Mary; plots; execution and its impact. 

• Conflict with Spain: reasons; events; naval warfare, including tactics and technology; the defeat of the Spanish Armada. 

Historical Environment

 

-The study of the historic environment will focus on a particular site in its historical context and should examine the relationship between a specific place and associated historical events and developments. 

-Students will be expected to answer a question that draws on second order concepts of change, continuity, causation and/or consequence, and to explore them in the context of the specified site and wider events and developments of the period studied. 

-Students should be able to identify key features of the specified site and understand their connection to the wider historical context of the specific historical period. Sites will also illuminate how people lived at the time, how they were governed and their beliefs and values. 

The following aspects of the site should be considered: 

• location 

• function 

• the structure 

• people connected with the site eg the designer, originator and occupants 

• design 

• how the design reflects the culture, values, fashions of the people at the time 

• how important events/developments from the depth study are connected to the site. 

The vision of the geography curriculum is to enable pupils to travel the world from their geography classroom. They will explore the physical environment and the human interaction with it gaining an appreciation of a range of places at various levels of development.  

In KS1-2 geography is taught through topics to develop a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives.  The learning is shaped by the learning superpowers: 

  • Ready – We have a genuine interest and a real sense of curiosity about the world and the people who live here. 

  • Resilient – We complete challenging activities using extensive base of geographical knowledge and vocabulary. 

  • Reflective – We develop our fluency in complex, geographical enquiry and the ability to apply questioning skills, as well as effective presentation techniques. 

  • Respectful - We have the ability to express well-balanced opinions, rooted in very good knowledge and understanding about current issues in society and the environment. 

  • Resourceful – We use a range of different equipment to draw clear conclusions and explain our findings. 

In KS3 this will focus on the study of the Sahel Region of Africa, SE Asia (including China, India and Pacific Rim).  Students will also appreciate the impact of climate change and the importance of sustainability, which run as themes right the way through the Key stage. 

In KS4 place examples will draw upon local places where possible, such as Portsmouth as UK city in Urban issues topic.  Where examples of LIC/NEE are needed these will use and build upon the knowledge gained in Key Stage 3 such as the Sahel, South East Asia and Nigeria and KS2 the Amazon in South America. 

Geographers at Mayfield will enjoy this fascinating and diverse subject which is vitally important in developing employability skills for their future lives. 

Locational Knowledge 

In KS1 we begin to build our locational knowledge focussing on naming and locating the world’s seven continents and five oceans, the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas. 

We begin to understand some of the features of an island by looking at the UK, the Isle of Wight and Portsmouth. Children can explain where they live and can tell someone their address. 

Place Knowledge 

We build an understanding of the geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of the United Kingdom and comparing it. It Year 1 we compare the UK to a desert which allows us to find out about about the differences between places that are hot and places that are cold. In Year two we look specifically at the seaside and compare the UK with St Lucia and Hawaii.  

Human and physical geography 

We identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and in the places around the world that we study. We monitor the weather locally and can answer questions about it. 

We use basic geographical vocabulary in all of the places we study to refer to:  

key physical features, including: beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather, key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop. 

Geographical skills and fieldwork 

In all of our topics, we learn about and use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans.  

We use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map. 

Additionally, aerial photographs and plan perspectives are used to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features. These are used to devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key. 

We use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of our school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.

Locational Knowledge 

During our range of topics, we locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe. We know which countries make up the European Union and can name some of the capital cities.  

We name and locate some of the main islands that surround the UK and use this knowledge to help us explain the difference between the British Isles, Great Britain and the UK. 

We identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night).   

Place Knowledge 

In the Romans topic in Year 3, we look at the country of Italy from an historical and modern day perspective.  In Year 4, we learn about the physical geographical characteristics of Portsmouth as well as learning about types of people who live in the city and why they live there.  We also learn about the continent of South America in our Rainforest topic focussing specifically on the Amazon Rainforest. In Year 5, we focus on the Mayans in Central America and in Year 6 we study Greece as part of our Ancient Greek topic. 

Human and physical geography 

During our Rainforest topic in Year 4 we look at climate zones and biomes. We also study the Yanomami people who are indigenous to the Rainforest and compare how they live with the way that we live our lives. We also study the Water Cycle looking at each of the processes in detail. 

In Year 3, we begin to look at mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes as part of the Roman topic with a focus on Mount Vesuvius. This is followed up in our Year 6 topic about natural disasters. 

In all our topics we look at the ways that humans, and specifically children, live their lives in the different countries and historical periods. 

Geographical skills and fieldwork 

Whenever we are locating countries, we use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate and describe features studied. 

We use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world. 

Pupils will cover the KS3 curriculum through a range of topics that will focus on key places in Africa and South East Asia.  Running through the whole of the KS are opportunities for pupils to deepen their understanding of the uniqueness of these places whilst seeing the interactions between physical and human geography that link places also.  Key themes that will feature throughout the course will be sustainability and climate change. 

Locational knowledge

The first prep in Year 7 will introduce pupils to the regions of the world, Africa and South East Asia that will be a focus of case studies throughout KS3.   

Place Knowledge 

Each topic in Year 7,8 and 9 will make links to these regions to deepen their understanding of these places.  They will focus on the contrasts between the these regions and their local geography.  This will be shown in the physical and human geography including climate, physical landscapes and human processes.  We want pupils to understand their local geography and how that fits into the global context. 

Human and physical geography 

All of the topics within the NC will be covered to varying degrees relevant to the places we focus upon.  When studying climate and weather in Year 7 contrasts between UK, SE Asia and Sahel region of Africa will be made.  When we consider glaciation and hydrology this will be in the context of UK flooding and glaciation compared to the arid Sahel, floods in Bangladesh and glaciation within the Himalayas.  The study of rivers and coasts will also involve fieldwork opportunities at the Witterings and the River Lymington. 

Year 8 will focus significantly on population and urbanisation and Year 9 will look synoptically at the elements of development linking all the key physical and human processes together.  Again, the focus on our regions in the world will enable contrasts.  There will be a large focus on Sahel regions in Africa including The Gambia and how physical processes have a significant impact upon the population dynamics in the region.  Contrasts will be drawn with China, India and the UK.   

Pupils will also be introduced to concepts and places that will feature in their KS4 studies. 

The themes of sustainability and climate change will feature in all topics as factors that show the links between physical and human processes in both directions. 

Our vision is that pupils will be able to enable students to think critically, evaluate the impacts of people on the planet and consider sustainable development. 

Geographical skills and fieldwork 

During Year 7-9 pupils will use a wide range of geographical skills, including the use of globes, maps and atlases and apply and develop this knowledge routinely in the classroom and in the field.  They will have the chance to use Ordnance Survey maps and if they participate in the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme this will be mastered to the point to plan and navigate a two day journey within the South Downs National Park.  The use of GIS will enable analysis of floodings and environmental management.  We aim to offer a range of fieldwork activities both within the school site and beyond to include coastal management and river processes where they will collect, analyse and draw conclusions from geographical data, using multiple sources of increasingly complex information. 

All the above skills will be practised and mastered within the context of topic when and where it is appropriate so that pupils move fromKS3 with confidence to use their geographical skills at the next level. 

We follow the AQA GCSE syllabus – within the document below are highlighted the case studies, places examples that we use at Mayfield and emphasised the Key themes which link back to learning in KS3. 

Challenge of Natural Hazards 

 

In this unit we study how Natural Hazards affect pose major risks to people and property and consider how the level of a countries development as well as location affect the impact and responses to those hazards. 

The focus on earthquake and volcanic eruptions will include a comprehensive understanding of tectonic theory and the different types of plate boundary and the specific hazards they pose.  We study the Nepal Earthquake of 2015, which was introduced to pupils in Year 9 and contrast it with the NZ earthquake of 2011 to see how the primary and secondary effects and the responses differ between these contrasting countries.  We use Iceland as an example of how to monitor and predict volcanic eruptions as well as to explain why some people choose to live in hazardous regions. 

The weather hazards will require a clear understanding of the global atmospheric model.  This is crucial for understanding this topic and also the locations of biomes within the Living World topic.  It also is behind the physical water scarcity that we study within the managing resources topic.  Our case study of a tropical storm is Typhoon Haiyan which pupils should recall from the Living on the edge topic in Year 9.   

Our UK storm example is Storm Desmond. This also links with the flooding in Cockermouth which we study in the Rivers section of the course 

We also consider the impacts of climate change as well as the natural and man made causes of it.  We use two examples to show how we can manage climate change.  Tuvalu shows how a Pacific Island country are adapting to climate change and we use local examples within Portsmouth to show strategies to mitigate climate change. These include the ‘cough, cough engine off scheme, cycle lanes, Park and Ride and the raising of the flood defences around Portsea Island. 

The Living World 

 

This topic is introduced through the study of ecosystems starting from small scale UK based ecosystem of a woodland.  This will then progress to global biomes where we then focus on Rainforest and Deserts as the option choice. 

Our study of rainforests and deserts include the physical characteristics of each biome and how plants and animals are adapted to survive in these environments.  We study the threats to the biomes, such as deforestation in the Amazon and desertification in the Sahel region and how these threats can be managed.  We also look at the economic opportunities and challenges of living in both the Amazon and the Thar Desert of India.  

Physical Landscapes in the UK 

Pupils will gain an overview of the location of major upland/ lowland areas and river systems. 

We focus our studies on the River and Coastal options due to our location on the South Coast. 

Pupils will understand the physical processes that lead to the creation of coastal and fluvial landforms.  Where appropriate we will use local examples such as Hurst Spit and East Head Spit and the Needles.  There will be the opportunity to undertake fieldwork at East Head Spit and/or Christchurch Bay to study coastal management. 

Our case study of river flooding is Cockermouth which enables us to consolidate and build upon the learning about Storm Desmond.  In this section pupils will understand the various ways approaches to coastal and river management and be able to evaluate the impact of these strategies. 

Urban issues and challenges 

 

In this topic we will study the causes of urbanisation and the reasons for differing rates of urban growth around the world. 

Within the topic pupils must study a major city in an LIC/NEE and a UK city. We choose to use Lagos in Nigeria and Portsmouth in UK 

Pupils will study the causes of urbanisation in Lagos and the impact of rapid population growth there.  They will look at the opportunities and challenges caused by rapid urban change by focussing on the area of Makoko.  They will consider strategies to solve some of the problems in the city including the floating school in Makoko. 

We use local examples and case studies in and around Portsmouth to illustrate urban change (Gunwharf Quays), regeneration, urban sprawl (Hazleton Form development), contrasting areas of inequality (Drayton and Farlington and Charles Dickens Ward).  There will be some fieldwork opportunities within this unit to prepare for Paper 3. 

We also consider the sustainability of Portsmouth and contrast this with the example of Sustainable City Dubai. 

The changing economic world 

This topic is done late on in Year 11 as it has many concepts which are synoptic and draw upon all the learning from KS3 and KS4.   

Pupils will understand how to measure levels of development within countries and evaluate the various development indicators.  They will also consider the causes of the development gap and various strategies to reduce the development gap including investment, industrial development and tourism, aid, using intermediate technology, fairtrade, debt relief, microfinance loans.  This will draw upon case studies from the Living World Topic, the Urban Issues topic and elements of climate change. 

Pupils are required to study one LIC/NEE.  WE use Nigeria, which was first introduced within Year 9 and now is explored to greater depth.  Studies will include the importance of the country, regionally and globally.  Pupils will consider aspects of development and factors that limit development including the political impact of Boko Haram, economic and environmental impact of TNCs such as Shell. Pupils will evaluate the impact of UK development aid in Nigeria. 

Pupils will also consider the economic future of the UK.  This links with considerations of careers for their own future.  Again, local examples are used where possible such as the regeneration of Gunwharf in Portsmouth following the decline of the ship industry.  Quaternary industry located at Southampton Science Park and strategies to address the North South Divide.  Pupils will evaluate the links and influence of the UK regionally and globally.   

The challenge of resource management 

 

Pupils will consider the significance of food, water and energy to economic and social well-being. They will have an overview of global inequalities in the supply and consumption of resources.  This will also draw upon knowledge from other topics. 

Pupils will gain an overview of these resources in the UK including changing demand on food, food miles and the trend towards agribusiness and using locally sourced food.  Sustainability is a key concept here that again links much of the learning from the whole of the geography curriculum.  They will understand the UKs energy mix and how and why that is changing as more renewable energy sources are encouraged. 

Pupils will understand the concepts of water surplus and deficit and locate those areas in the UK whilst considering sustainable ways to reduce deficits.   This will also be studied on a larger global scale where they will be expected to use synoptic knowledge and understanding about physical and human causes of water deficit and insecurity.  They will revisit case study about Play pumps from Changing economic world to provide  sustainable small scall solution in LICs as well as the Indira Gandhi Canal, first studied in the Living world topic as the large scale water transfer system. 

Geographical Application 

 

Throughout the course pupils will engage with a wide range of resources and stimulus material.  They will become critical thinkers able to apply their knowledge and understanding to unfamiliar examples and questions.  This is crucial for Paper 3 of the GCSE and the 9mark questions within Papers 1 and 2.  Regular practice and feedback will enable pupils to do this.  Practice recall is a feature of every geography lesson as it is vital that pupils are able to recall specific knowledge to use within their thinking and written response. 

There are two required fieldtrips with GCSE that are to be taken in and urban and countryside environment.  We will use Portsmouth and local coastal areas for these and pupils will engage in an enquiry approach to provide pupils with the opportunity to demonstrate geographical skills and applied knowledge and understanding by looking at a inequality within Portsmouth and Coastal management.   Pupils will investigate a question for geographical enquiry, select, measure and record appropriate data, select appropriate ways of processing and presenting fieldwork data, describe, analyse and explain fieldwork data reaching conclusions before completing an evaluation of geographical enquiry. 

The purpose of religious education at Mayfield is to introduce young people to a religious way of looking at the world that exists and what this can offer to people’s lives both individually and collectively. We aim for each student to  gain knowledge and understanding of Christianity as well as other religions and worldviews, to learn to show respect for different beliefs and practices, people of different faiths and life stances, as well as  contributing towards their own spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.  

The curriculum at Mayfield school from KS1 to KS4 gives pupils opportunities to understand their spiritual identity, to adhere to moral values and to heighten their awareness of the importance of promoting community cohesion and inclusion in our increasingly diverse society.  

Through our curriculum we aim to ask challenging questions about meaning and purpose in life, beliefs about God, issues of right and wrong and what it means to be human. We do this by following a concept approach to RE using the SACRE model of cycle of enquiry and explore concepts that are common to all people such as celebration & community, concepts that are common to many religions such as God and Worship and some concepts that are distinctive to particular religions such as Trinity and Agape.  This process involves being able to describe, explain and analyse these concepts both on a  personal level and through exploring religious beliefs and practices, being able to recognise the diversity which exists within and between both communities and individuals,  whilst also allowing students to develop their own ideas, values and identities.  

We want students to be able to articulate clearly and coherently their personal beliefs, ideas, values and experiences while respecting the right of others to differ. We develop this by allowing opportunities where possible for whole group and small group discussions and group work. 

We make links to many of our super learning powers/6Rs in RE. 

Ready – pupils are ready to listen to beliefs that may be different to their own  

Respectful – children listen to other people’s opinions and accept them, even though they may be different to theirs. 

Reflective – part of the Living Difference cycle is to think of their own lives and reflect on how themes are part of their own experiences. 

Responsible – children have to be responsible and considerate when listening to an discussing other people’s faith and beliefs. 

Resilient – children need to persevere when they may be learning about things that they don’t necessarily believe in. 

• That all children form their own opinions about religious beliefs and customs and that they develop an understanding and acceptance of people who hold a strong faith.  

• That children enjoy learning about religion because it is taught in a stimulating and interesting way that arouses their curiosity and develops positive skills and attitudes. 

 • That children develop a sense of awe and wonder about the world around them.  

• To help pupils understand some of the impact of religion throughout the world, its influences on the lives of individuals and communities and its effect on the cultural diversity of their own and other societies both presently and in the past. 

• To support pupils’ spiritual, moral social and cultural development by encouraging self-awareness and self-respect.  

• To help pupils develop their social and moral development by encouraging a positive attitude and valuing the beliefs of others, however different from their own.  

• To develop knowledge and understanding of Christian and other major religion in Britain as a whole and in the local community. 

Content 

KS1 

YR R – Christianity 

Specialness, Celebrating birth, Learning from Jesus, Symbols of New life,  

Yr 1 – Christianity & Judaism 

Thankfulness, Journey’s End, Remembering, Welcoming, Belonging, Authority 

Yr 2 – Christianity & Judaism 

Symbols, Light as a Symbol, Change, Sadness to Happiness, Authority, Remembering 

• That all children form their own opinions about religious beliefs and customs and that they develop an understanding and acceptance of people who hold a strong faith.  

• That children enjoy learning about religion because it is taught in a stimulating and interesting way that arouses their curiosity and develops positive skills and attitudes. 

 • That children develop a sense of awe and wonder about the world around them.  

• To help pupils understand some of the impact of religion throughout the world, its influences on the lives of individuals and communities and its effect on the cultural diversity of their own and other societies both presently and in the past. 

• To support pupils’ spiritual, moral social and cultural development by encouraging self-awareness and self-respect.  

• To help pupils develop their social and moral development by encouraging a positive attitude and valuing the beliefs of others, however different from their own.  

• To develop knowledge and understanding of Christian and other major religion in Britain as a whole and in the local community. 

Content 

Yr 3 – Christianity & Hinduism 

Messages, Angels, Good and Evil, Suffering, Sacred Places, Protection 

Yr 4 – Christianity & Hinduism 

Temptation, Holy, Myth, Ritual. Devotion, Symbols 

Yr 5 – Christianity & Islam 

Belonging (Shahada and salt), Interpretation( Christmas - the 2 birth narratives), Stewardship (creation), Justice, Sacred Places, Umma 

Yr 6 - Christianity & Islam 

Laws (Jesus the law breaker), Warning(The Magi), Ritual(Wudu and Eid Ul Fitr), Resurrection(The empty cross), Ceremony (Death cermonies), Peace (Revelation of the Qu’ran, sawm and Ramadan) 

Aims 

  • To develop the skills of Religious Education of communication, apply, enquire, contextulise and evaluation as set out in the agreed syllabus for Hampshire schools (Living Difference III) 

  • To allow pupils to first attend their own experience and that of others in regards to the concepts that form the basis on enquiry. 

  • To provide students the opportunity to study Christianity and at least 2 other religions. 

  • Through the teaching of Religious Education by concepts allow students to understand and  express their experience of their own place in the world. 

  • To provide an opportunity for students to engage critically with their experience of different ways of living a religious or non religious life. 

  • To provide understanding of different ways of living to promote tolerance of others within school and wider societies. 

  • To raise curiosity about the different ways people live and encourage pupils to ask perceptive questions. 

Content 

  • ‘My Island’ At introduction to RE. Concepts: Survival, Community, Rites of passage, Law and Sacred 

  • Christianity 1: What does it mean to be Christian today? concepts- Agape, God & Church 

  • Judaism: What does it mean to be Jewish today? Concepts- Torah, Tradition, Remembrance 

  • Christianity 2:  Should Christians forgive? Concepts- Forgiveness, Reconciliation 

  • Islam: What does it mean to be Muslim today? Concepts- Islam, Ummah, Jihad 

  • Sikhism: What does it mean to follow the Sikhi tradition today? Concepts -Teacher/Guru , Khalsa, Service/Sewa 

  • Stewardship and care of the environment (Christianity is the main focus) concepts- Care, Hope 

  • Buddhism: what does it mean to follow the Buddhist tradition? Concepts- Impermanence, community and loving/kindness 

  • Inspirational people 

RE lessons at KS4 are combined with PSHE. Religious education is taught either through specific religious topics or incorporated into lessons where pupils enquire into a wider social, moral or ethical issues, and then look at it from a religious perspective.  This allows for pupils to have an awareness of how religious people may view a topical problem or issue in the world, and how it can affect the way of live for individuals and collective groups.  

RE modules: 

  • Religion in a contemporary society 

  • Life after death 

Religious attitudes incorporated into; 

  • Medical Ethics 

  • Relationships inc contraception, forced marriage and FGM 

  • Religion and charity 

  • Religion and Mental Health (suicide) 

The vision of the travel and tourism curriculum is to prepare pupils to be able to explore the real world as tourists or travellers and also give them skills to enter into further training or work within the travel and tourism industry. 

The key elements that will enable this are: 

  • involvement with the local travel and tourism industry through visits, trips or guest speakers  

  • Exciting learning opportunities in the classroom where they will study concrete examples of tourist organisations and destinations 

  • A course that blends internally assessed coursework and external examinations. 

KS4 Award 

We follow the Pearson Btec Travel and Tourism syllabus – within the document below are highlighted the concrete examples that we use at Mayfield. 

The Award gives learners the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. Learners will develop:  

• knowledge that underpins the effective use of skills, processes and attitudes in the sector such as the appeal of different tourist destinations to different types of customer, and the factors that influence travel and tourism  

• skills such as researching different travel and tourism organisations, the features of tourist destinations, and the products and services available to meet the needs of different customers  

• attitudes that are considered to be very important in the travel and tourism sector, including how to develop tourism while respecting the environment and local communities. 

 

 

Content 

Component 1: Travel and Tourism Organisations and Destinations 

There are many organisations involved with different aspects of travel and tourism, including travel agents, tour operators, transport and accommodation providers and visitor attractions. In this component, pupils will learn about the wide range of different travel and tourism organisations and their aims such as making a profit, providing services, promoting a cause or contributing to the community. They will explore how different travel and tourism organisations work with each other to offer products and services, and the importance of the travel and tourism sector to the UK economy, including direct and indirect contributions. People travel for different reasons, including leisure, business and to visit friends and relatives. Tourist destinations are likely to have several features that appeal to visitors such as coastal scenery, beaches, different types of accommodation and local attraction. They are often easy to travel to with a choice of transport options. Pupils will gain an understanding of the different types of travel and tourism and the features of destinations that appeal to visitors. This component will give them an understanding of the role of different travel and tourism organisations, and the features and appeal of tourist destinations. Pupils will develop transferable skills such as research skills, which will support their progression to Level 2 or 3 vocational or academic qualifications. 

The local examples used include Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, visitPortsmouth, The Marriott Hotel and the Portsmouth International Ferry Port. 

Component 2: Influences on Global Travel and Tourism 

There are many factors that may influence global travel and tourism, and they are constantly changing. For example, severe weather events, political and economic factors, and the publicity a destination receives can all affect the decisions visitors make and the way some travel and tourism organisations operate. Concrete examples we will study are the Iceland eruption, how New Zealand has built tourism around the film industry. 

Tourism can have a positive and a negative impact on local communities, the economy and the environment, and the issue of sustainability is a concern for many destinations, organisations and governments. In this component, pupils will consider the factors that may influence travel and tourism and the ways that travel and tourism organisations, destinations and governments respond to these influences and their reasons. For example, to maintain sales and income, diversify economies, increase tourist numbers or reassure visitors. They will explore the possible impacts of tourism such as leakage, habitat loss and employment creation, and consider ways these can be managed by destinations, organisations and governments.  

Pupils will investigate how tourism may bring change to destinations over time and how destinations can encourage, manage and develop tourism. Concrete examples will be Bali, Benidorm and emerging destinations appropriate to each year.  Pupils will develop skills in analysing information and making recommendations for a specific purpose, which will support their progression to Level 2 or Level 3 vocational or academic qualifications. 

Component 3: Customer Needs in Travel and Tourism 

Pupils will learn about the basic and specific travel and tourism needs of different types of customer and the factors that can influence their needs and preferences. They will also learn how travel and tourism organisations meet these needs and preferences by offering a variety of products and services, including different types of holiday and accommodation. They will apply their understanding by selecting products and services and planning a holiday to meet the needs of specific customers. In this component, they will have the opportunity to apply learning from Components 1 and 2 when considering how organisations use research to identify and respond to tourism trends and when selecting and planning products, services and holidays to meet customer needs and preferences.  

The PSHE curriculum at Mayfield equips learners with the knowledge, understanding, attitudes, values and skills they need in order to reach their potential as individuals and within the community. Bringing real life examples and consideration for future careers into the classroom, PSHE allows our learners to thrive and develop in respect of their relationships, health and wellbeing and understanding of the wider world and their place in it.  

The wellbeing of our learners is central to all that we do at Mayfield and through PSHE lessons, learners are encouraged to develop an understanding of wellbeing and how to evaluate the impact that a range of actions or situations can have on their own wellbeing. Through learning about healthy lifestyles, the importance of getting enough sleep and the impact of drugs, alcohol and smoking on the body, students are equipped with the knowledge to make responsible life choices as they grow older, and to understand the impact of choices that they make, both in the immediate and longer terms. 

From joining us in year R through to year 11, our learners develop an understanding of how to identify and build appropriate, respectful and healthy relationships with those around them, always at an age-appropriate level. Through this, students learn the value of family and how this may look in different circumstances and contexts, as well as what key principles underpin this.  

Our learners build confidence and resilience through their PSHE lessons and become well-equipped for a healthy life outside of school, through understanding consequences of actions, how to engage with the wider world, and how to engage with a joyful and successful life as they move into young adulthood.  

The Curriculum for PSHE is the Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education. It does not divide the expectations by Key Stage, but instead gives ‘by the end of primary’ and ‘by the end of secondary’ criteria. We have therefore divided this guidance into Key Stages and year groups to show where we plan on delivering each area of the curriculum. Some areas are re-visited in greater depth in later years due to the nature of the spiral curriculum that we deliver, however we have below listed the first time that a learner will meet a concept/area of the guidance. Also delivered through PSHE lessons is the Citizenship National Curriculum.  

Students in the Primary section will follow the Jigsaw scheme of learning, with additional areas covered and explained which are specific to the students at Mayfield. The Jigsaw learning is a spiral curriculum, building on 6 themes – Being me in my world, celebrating difference, dreams and goals, healthy me, relationships and changing me.  

Year R 

Throughout all of their topics in year R, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by learning to say how they feel about a topic and listening to the views of others. Students will begin their PSHE learning year R, with a unit on being me in my world. Students will learn about understanding feelings, self-identity, being in a classroom, being gentle and the concept of rights and responsibilities. This serves as an introduction to PSHE for students and helps them to understand their place in their class.  

To introduce students to the theme of celebrating difference, they will consider their talents, being special, families, where we live, making friends and the importance of standing up for yourself. This is a foundation of knowledge for understanding that it is okay to be different to those around us, and difference is something that we should celebrate in school and our communities.  

Students will then study a unit about dreams and goals. Within this, they will consider challenges that they might face, perseverance and the importance of not giving up, goal-setting, overcoming obstacles, how to ask for help, what jobs exist and how to achieve goals.  

When learning about healthy me in year R, students will learn about how to exercise their body, and what physical activity is and that it is important to keeping us healthy. Students will to identify healthy foods and develop an understanding about the importance of sleep. Students will begin to learn how to keep their body clean and safe. This will begin students’ development of one of our key skills, being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year R students will develop an awareness that some things are not safe for them.  

Students will begin their relationships education by thinking about family life and who is in their families, and the features of friendships. Students will learn about making friends and being a good friend, as well as understand that sometimes friends fall out and what to do in this situation. Students will begin to develop an understanding of bullying and what to do if they are worried, as well as how to be a good friend.  

Students will finish their year R learning with a unit about changing me, in which they will begin to think about the different parts of their body and why it is important to respect our bodies. Students will think about some of the growth and changed that has happened to them since they were a baby. Students will also consider what they find fun or what they find fearful, and how and why we might have celebrations.  

Year 1 

Throughout all of their topics in year 1, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by learning to explain how they feel about the topics and understanding that other people can have different views to themselves. As in Year R, students in year 1 will start the year by considering the topic of being me in my world. They will begin to learn about feeling special and safe, and in particular being safe in their class. Students will also learn about being part of a class and the idea of ‘belonging’ and rights and responsibilities within their class and the importance of ensuring that the class is a safe space for everyone to learn in. Students will consider rewards and feeling proud of achievements, as well as consequences of actions, and owning a class ‘learning charter’.  

Students will then progress onto their topic of celebrating difference and consider how people in their class are similar or different from each other. Students will then consider what bullying is and what can be done about it, as well as how being bullied might feel and who they can speak to if they are feeling unhappy or bullied. As part of their celebrating difference unit, students in year 1 will think about ways they can make new friends and how this might feel, as well as understanding differences between themselves and friends and how these make us special and unique.  

When considering dreams and goals, students in year 1 will create a ‘treasure chest of success’, considering their successes and achievements and setting simple goals which they may be able to achieve. Students will then explore how to achieve goals that they have set and how they learn best, as well as working with partners and celebrating achievements of partners. During this unit, students will consider how to tackle new challenges and how they might feel whilst facing a challenge, as well as what obstacles might make it difficult to achieve a goal whilst working out how to overcome them, and how this might make them feel. This unit will conclude with students considering how they feel when they succeed in a new challenge and how they can celebrate their successes. 

Students will build on their understanding of health me in year 1, by learning the differences between being healthy and unhealth and how this might make them feel, as well as how to make healthy lifestyle choices. Students will also learn how to keep themselves clean and health and understand how germs could cause illness or disease. Students will also think about products such as medicines and understand that these can be harmful if misused, but that medicines can also help if we are unwell and if they are used safely. Students will begin to learn about road safety and how to keep safe when crossing the road, as well as who to speak to if they are feeling frightened. This unit will conclude with students being able to say why they think their body is amazing and identifying some ways to keep it safe and healthy. This unit will continue to build students’ development of one of our key skills, being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 1 students will learn to identify things that keep them safe. 

To develop students’ learning about relationships in year 1, students will consider different members of their families and the fact that there are different types of family, what being a good friend is and appropriate ways of physical contact for greeting friends, as well as which ways they prefer. Students will also consider who can help them in our school community and how to ask for help, as well as what their personal qualities are as a person and friend. This unit will also build students’ development of being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 1 students will learn to identify people that keep them safe. 

For the topic of changing me in year 1, students will learn about the life cycles on animals and humans, as well as about their changing body and things that have changed or stayed the same since they were a baby. Students will also learn the correct words to describe body parts and how to cope with changes that happen in life.  

Year 2 

Throughout all of their topics in year 2, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by learning to explain their feelings on topics and understanding why other people might have different views to themselves. On the topic of being me in my world in year 2, students will consider their hopes and fears for the year and who to speak to if they are worried and need to ask for help. Students will also develop an understanding how their rights and responsibilities as a member of the school, as well as their class as they learned about in year 1. Students will share and listen to ideas regarding rewards and consequences, as well as considering how following the class charter will help them and others learn, helping them to work cooperatively.  

Students will then study the celebrating differences unit, in which they will consider the concept of stereotypes through an understanding of how some people make assumptions about girls and boys. Students will also understand that it is okay that girls and boys are both similar and different and understand that sometimes bullying happens as a result of differences but that it is important to always be kind. Students will be able to recognise what is right and wrong and know who to speak to if they are being bullied, as well as how to make friends and what being and having a friend feels like. Students will conclude this unit by considering ways that they are different from their friends and how this makes us unique and special.  

Students will build on the skills and knowledge that they developed in year 1 about dreams and goals, by choosing realistic goals and thinking about how to achieve them. Students will develop an understanding of how to persevere even when tasks are difficult, and who they find it easy or more difficult to work with. Students will take part in a group challenge to develop their teamwork skills and will learn that working with other people can help us to solve problems. Students will consider how to share successes with other people and how contributing to the success of a group feels. 

When studying their healthy me unit in year 2, students will develop an understanding of what they need to do to keep their body healthy. They will also be able to demonstrate what being relaxed means and name some things that make them relaxed and stressed. Students will understand how medicines work and why it is important to use these safely. Students will also consider the different food groups and how a balance of these help to keep us healthy, allowing them to make healthy food and snack choices. This unit will continue to build students’ development of our key skill of being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 2 students will start to learn to make healthy choices. 

When learning about relationships in year 2, students will be able to understand their relationship to each of their family members and the importance of sharing and co-operation. Students will be able to identify different forms of physical contact within a family and that some is acceptable, whilst some is not. Students will also develop an understanding of things that cause conflict with those around them. Students in year 2 will learn that sometimes it is good to keep secrets, but other times it is not and who to speak to about this, as well as recognising people who can help them in their family, school and community.  

Students’ learning about changing me in year 2 will consider the different lifecycles in nature, and the natural process of growing from young to old and understand that this is not within their control. Students will continue to develop their understanding of how their body has changed from when they were a baby and how boys and girls are physically different, using the correct words for parts of the body. Students will also develop an understanding that some parts of their body are private. In year 2, students will consider different types of touch and identify those which they do or do not like and will develop confidence in saying what they like and don’t like and asking for help when need.  

Year 3 

Throughout all of their topics in year 3, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by learning to that what they say and their views could affect other people. Students will continue in KS2 to follow the same PSHE theme structure as they had in KS1. In year 3, students will consider being me in my world, by developing an understanding of their worth and being able to recognise positive things about themselves, and their achievements. Students will also consider how to face new challenges positively, make responsible choices and recognise different emotions in themselves and others. Students will learn about rules and how they link to rights and responsibilities, building on their learning about these in KS1. Students will also lean about how their actions affect themselves and others, developing their understanding about rewards and consequences of actions, and enabling students to make responsible choices independently and in groups.  

To develop their understanding of celebrating difference in year 3, students will consider how everybody’s family is different, and that differences and conflicts sometimes happen among family members, but that conflict can be resolved using the ‘solve it together’ technique. Students will also learn about bullying, and we will link this learning to our Bee Kind group at Mayfield to help the students in primary identify who throughout the school can help them if they experience or witness bullying. Students during this unit will also learn about how some words an be hurtful and will be able to give examples of these, as well as the consequences that words can have on feelings.  

During their dreams and goals unit, students in year 3 will develop their understanding that different people face and overcome different challenges. Students will begin to identify dreams and goals that are important to them and think about how it might feel to achieve these. Students will apply this learning to develop their resilience, motivation and enthusiasm in accessing new learning challenges. Finally, students will begin to evaluate their own learning process and recognise things that may hinder their achievement, and how they can overcome these.  

In their healthy me unit, students will develop an understanding of the importance of exercise and how it affects the body. Students will also develop knowledge about drugs and begin to form their own opinions on this, as well as what things, people and places they need to keep safe from and some ways that they can keep themselves safe. Students’ prior learning about how medicines household substances can be harmful if misused will be built on, as well as their understanding of how important it is to take care of their bodies. This unit will continue to build students’ development of our key skill of being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 3 students will learn to identify things that may be unsafe, as well as strategies for keeping safe 

In the year 3 relationships unit, students will be able to identify the roles and responsibilities of different members of their family, and will start to put into practice some of the friendship skills that they have been learning, such as being a good listener. Students will also develop some strategies for keeping themselves safe, again building on the key skills, and will understand how the actions and work of people around the world have an impact on them. Building on this, students will understand how their needs and rights are shared by children around the world, but that their lives may be quite different. Students will also learn how to express their appreciation to their friends and family.  

To conclude year 3, students will revisit the changing me topic, considering how babies grow and develop from conception and what they need to be able to live and grow, as well as how boys’ and girls’ bodies change as they grow up, to be able to make babies as they get older. Students will also begin to consider what stereotypical ideas they have about parenting and family roles and be able to express how they feel when their ideas are challenged.  

Year 4 

Throughout all of their topics in year 4, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by learning to explain how what they say and their views could affect other people and why it is important to listen to the views of others. To understand being me in my world in year 4, students will learn about being a class team and their contributions to this, as well as who is within their school community and how they fit into this. Students will begin to develop an understanding of democracy through the school council and will understand that their actions affect themselves and others, developing empathy for those around them. Students will also learn about decision making as part of a group and how democracy can benefit the school community. 

Celebrating difference will allow our year 4 students to consider how to challenge assumptions, and why sometimes people make assumptions based on what people look like. Students will also be able to speak about a time when a first impression has changed. This will allow our students to become more understanding and accepting of differences. Students will also continue to build on their understanding about bullying and know what to do if they are unsure whether bullying has taken place as well as how to problem-solve a bullying situation with others. Students will be encouraged to develop their self-reflection by identifying what is special about them and be able to value the ways in which they are unique.  

Students in year 4 will then complete a unit on dreams and goals, being able to say what some of their hopes and dreams are and understand that sometimes they do not come true, as well as how this might feel. Students will be encouraged to reflect on positive and happy experiences and think about how this can help them to overcome disappointment, as well as set new goals after disappointment. Students will also learn how to work out the steps needed to achieve a goal and work well in a group to achieve this.  

When studying their healthy me unit, students in year 4 will learn about how different friendship groups are formed and how these can lead to changing dynamics and roles in different groups. Students will also learn the facts about smoking and alcohol and the effects that it has on health, as well as why some people choose to smoke and drink alcohol. Students will learn the importance of resisting peer pressure and have a clear picture of what they believe to be right and wrong. This unit will continue to build students’ development of our key skill of being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 4 students will learn to recognise that others’ choices might not always be safe for them.  

When considering the relationships unit, students in year 4 will learn to identify how close they are to various people within their web of relationships, as well as identifying someone that they love and expressing why that person is special to them. They will also think about their memories of someone that they no longer see and consider whether animals should be considered as special by looking at an animal rights issue. Students will also be able to understand how people feel when they love a special pet, as well as how to show love and appreciation to the people and animals that are special to them.  

To conclude their year 4 learning, students will consider the changing me topic, in which they will learn that some of their characteristics come from each of their birth parents as a result of them being made from the joining of their sperm and egg. Students will learn to label the internal and external body parts that are needed to make a baby, and how a girl’s body changes (such as menstruation), to allow this to happen. Students will begin to understand that change may or may not be within our control but may be something that we have to accept is happening.  

Year 5  

Throughout all of their topics in year 5, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by learning to understand the views of others and that it is okay to change their views on topics. Students in year 5 will begin their being me in my world learning by thinking about the year ahead and how to face the challenges that this may present positively. They will understand their wider rights and responsibilities both as a British citizen and within the school. Students will also learn to make choices regarding their behaviour with consideration of the rewards and consequences that it may incur, as well as how it could impact on a group. Students will also develop their understanding of democracy within the school community.  

When considering their unit on celebrating differences, students in year 5 will learn about different cultures and how cultural differences can sometimes cause conflict, as well as what racism and rumours are and what the impact of these may be. Building on their prior learning about bullying, students will understand the difference between direct and indirect bullying and begin to consider matters such as the importance of money and experiences of those of other cultures to their own.  

Students in year 5 will continue to consider their dreams and goals by understanding that they will need money to be able to achieve some of their goals, and that there are a range of jobs carried out by people which lead to different amounts of money. Students will begin to identify jobs they might like to do when they grow up and think about what they might need to do to achieve this. Students will link this learning to that of differences, by thinking about how people who live in a culture different to their own may have different dreams and goals, and how communicating with them could mean that they could learn from each other.  

When developing their understanding of healthy me, students in year 5 will be able to explain the risks of smoking and the effects it can have on a range of body parts, as well as the risks associated with alcohol misuse, including the way that this can impact behaviour as well as health. Students will lean basic emergency aid procedures and know how to get help in emergency situations. A focus here will be put also on the use of the coastguard as an emergency service, due to the location of our school. Students will develop an understanding of how the media and celebrities can promote certain body types, and the different roles that food can play in people’s lives whilst developing an understanding of how body image pressures can link to eating disorders. Students should be able to make healthy choices. This unit will continue to build students’ development of our key skill of being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 5 students learn to identify substances that may be unsafe.  

When learning about relationships in year 5, students will consider who they are as a person and be able to identify their own characteristics and qualities. Students will develop a recognition of how friendships can change and know how to make new friends and move on from old friendships. Students will also begin to learn about how it feels to be attracted to someone and what having a boyfriend or girlfriend might mean. Students will develop an understanding of staying safe whilst using technology to communicate with friends. 

For their changing me topic in year 5, students will become aware of their own self-image and how body image fits into that. They will be able to explain how boys’ and girls’ bodies change in puberty and why it is important to look after yourself physically and emotionally. Students will begin their learning about how sexual intercourse can lead to conception, but that sometimes people need to have IVF to help them to have a baby. Students will look ahead to what they are looking forward to about becoming a teenager and understand that this brings different responsibilities, such as the age of consent.  

Year 6 

Throughout all of their topics in year 6, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by learning to empathise with a range of views of other people and that it is important to respect that these may be different to their own. In their final year of KS2 being me in my world, students will identify their goals, fears and worries about the future and how to express them. Students will learn about the universal rights that children have, and that for many children these rights are not met. Students will think about how their actions can affect other people both locally and globally and when making choices about their behaviour, will be able to understand the rewards and consequences, as well as their rights and responsibilities. 

When studying their celebrating differences unit, students in year 6 will understand what different perceptions about normal means, and how having a disability could affect someone’s life. Students will be able to explain some of the ways that one person or group may have power over another and some of the reasons that people use bullying behaviours. Students will also be able to give examples of people with disabilities who live amazing lives and of ways in which difference can be a source of conflict or cause for celebration.  

To conclude their learning about dreams and goals, students in year 6 will understand their learnings strengths and set personal goals, as well as working out the steps that they need to take to achieve the goal and how they might motivate themselves to do this. Students will identify problems in the world that concern them and discuss them with other people, as well as working with others to help to make the world a better place. Students will learn what others admire about them and how to accept their praise. 

When learning about healthy me, students in year 6 will consider the impact of food on the body, the different types of drugs and their uses and their effects on the body and will be able to evaluate when alcohol is being used responsibly, anti-socially or misused. Students will be able to demonstrate basic emergency aid procedures and recognise how to get help in an emergency. Students will explore emotional health and what it means to be well, as well as people’s attitudes to mental health. This will lead to an understanding of what makes them stressed, the triggers that case this and how to respond. This unit will continue to build students’ development of our key skill of being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 6 students will learn to explain how some substances are dangerous to them. 

With regards to relationships in year 6, students will be able to identify who the most significant people to them are in their lives, as well as understanding love and loss and the causes, feelings and stages of grief. Students will also learn how to recognise when people are trying to gain power control, and how technology may be used as part of this. This will allow students to understand how to prevent this from happening and how to use technology positively and safely to communicate with their friends.  

PSHE in year 6 concludes with the changing me topic, with students developing an understanding of self-esteem. Students will also develop their understanding about the changes that take place during puberty and have the opportunity to have their questions about this answered. Students will learn how babies develop throughout pregnancy and how they are born, as well as how being physically attracted to someone changes the nature of the relationship.

Year 7 

Throughout all of their topics in year 7, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by learning to confidently express their views on a range of topics and empathise with the views of others. Students will study a unit about working with others, in which they will develop an understanding that happiness is linked to being connected to others, and the importance of being a good citizen. Students will also understand the importance of respect both in school and in society, including with regards to those in positions of authority.  

Students’ PSHE learning will continue to develop through learning about healthy lifestyles, with key focuses on maintaining a healthy diet, the health risks of having too much sugar or an unhealthy diet, the importance of sleep and the benefits of exercise. This will build on the learning that students encountered in KS1 and 2, to consolidate the key messages about healthy lifestyles.  

Students’ understanding of relationships developed throughout KS2 will be built on in year 7, with a focus on the characteristics of different types of healthy relationships, how to identify respectful relationships, and the problems that may be caused by stereotypes This will equip students with the skills and language to identify whether a relationship or friendship is respectful and healthy.  

Developing students’ understanding of health and wellbeing further, students will learn the facts about the harms of smoking, as well as where they can access help regarding this. This unit will continue to build students’ development of our key skill of being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 7 students will be able to explain how some substances are dangerous to them and the affect that they could have on their body. Students will also develop the skills to resist peer pressure regarding these.  

The wider world is one of the key themes that students learn about throughout their time at Mayfield, and in year 7, students will learn about extremism, what this is and why some people become extremists. This is part of the Citizenship learning and will help students to understand how extreme behaviours can be challenged.  

For their final unit in year 7 PSHE, students will learn about growing up, considering the changes that happen in males and females and how this might impact on their emotional and physical wellbeing. Students are therefore equipped with the knowledge and skills for these changes. 

Year 8 

Throughout all of their topics in year 8, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by considering what different views on a topic may be and being able to explain why they hold the views that they do. Our students will begin year 8 with a unit of learning about body image. In this, they will develop an understanding about self-esteem and body image, as well as the influence that the media and social media can have on these. This enables students to develop confidence in themselves and understand that they should not compare themselves with those around them, but instead be proud of themselves and their bodies.  

Students’ PSHE learning will continue through a development of the understanding of money management. Students will consider different attitudes to money and begin to understand that money and happiness are not always interconnected, and do not need to be. Students will also develop an understanding of budgeting, equipping them with the skills and knowledge needed to manage their money on a daily basis, as well as the skills to plan for future or more long-term financial needs.  

In year 7, our students began to learn about relationships and this knowledge will be built on in year 8 when students study a unit on relationships and staying safe. During this, students will consider the difference between online and real-life relationships, developing the knowledge and skills to determine the safety and trustworthiness of relationships and sources of information. Students will also learn about image sharing and the law, including the possible legal, social and emotional consequences of sharing images, particularly those which are indecent. This unit will conclude with students further developing their understanding of peer pressure and bullying, including cyberbullying, and where they can get help if they are concerned.  

Students’ understanding of health and wellbeing will be developed in year 8 through a study into mental health and emotional wellbeing, which is consolidated through their year 8 prep project. Students will learn the consequences of poor emotional wellbeing and how to talk about their and others’ emotions sensitively and what vocabulary is suitable to use in this situation. Students will also develop an understanding of the early signs of wellbeing concerns and the symptoms of some common mental ill health concerns. This will enable students to learn about how to cope with the different emotions that they will experience in life and to acknowledge when they may need to ask for help for themselves or those around them.  

Year 8 PSHE will continue to prepare students for their futures through a unit looking at careers, in which students will think about their ambitions for when they grow up. Students will be encouraged to think about their dream future and create a plan of how they may be able to get there. This will include research into different careers that may interest students and will allow students to develop an idea of how they might be able to access these careers, as well as the skills that they may need to develop to get there. Students will also consider the importance of health and safety at work, as well as first aid treatments for basic injuries, which is a skill that students are then able to transfer into their everyday life.  

Students’ understanding of the wider world will be developed in year 8 with a unit on politics, enabling students to understand how the UK is governed, the role of democracy and political parties and how voting rights have developed over time. This will enable students to understand the world around them and how decisions are made that affect their lives. It will also develop students’ appreciation for the British Value of Democracy. 

PSHE learning in year 8 will conclude with students studying internet safety, through the ‘Be Internet Citizens’ unit of work. Students will study the idea that there are ‘3 sides to every story’ and the importance of not taking everything that they read online to be automatically true. This will enable students to become more responsible consumers of the online world. Students will also learn about online emotional manipulation, how to recognise the signs of this, and where to get support if they are concerned. This unit will continue to build students’ development of our key skill of being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 8 students will consider the safety of the decisions that they make both in the physical and online worlds.  

Year 9 

Throughout all of their topics in year 9, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by learning to confidently express their views on a range of topics, and consider what the views of others might be based on factors such as their religious background. In year 9, students’ learning of PSHE will build on that in year 8, through considering challenges to British Values, such as extremism and terrorism. Students will consider how and why people become radicalised and how the actions of extremists and terrorists go against the British Values. Students will also learn about islamophobia and how to tackle this to ensure that we are being respectful of those of all religions and faiths.  

Students will then move on to an extended unit studying sex and relationships education. This will build on the prior learning that students will have done on relationships, by revisiting what a positive relationship is and how to maintain them. This will be built on by developing an awareness of exploitation, bullying and harassment in relationships and how to respond to this, a factor which has been identified as particularly important to students in our local area due to the prevalence of operations such as county lines. Students will also learn about the different types of long-term relationships and their legal status, and the importance of consent and how to recognise whether consent has been given. Following this, students will develop an understanding of different contraceptive methods and the choices available to them, as well as the efficacy of the different options available. Students will also learn about different STIS, including HIV/AIDs, how they are transmitted and the importance of being tested for these and getting early treatment if necessary, as well as about the precautions that they can take to avoid getting STIs. Students will conclude this unit through a study of pregnancy, the choices related to pregnancy such as the facts about abortion, adoption and choosing to keep a baby. This will be built on through an understanding of the experiences that some people have of pregnancy, as well as the facts around miscarriage. This will enable learners to make healthy choices in their relationships and consider the impact that their choices may have on themselves and those around them.  

Students’ learning of year 9 PSHE will be concluded with a unit of learning around drugs and alcohol. In this, students will think about the laws surrounding illegal substances, as well as the dangers of drugs which are prescribed but can still present health risks. Students will also consider different illegal drugs, and the range of views surrounding cannabis, whilst learning the short- and long-term effects that taking illegal drugs can have on themselves, their relationships, and the choices that they make. Students will also develop their learning about county lines and where to get help if they are concerned that they, or someone that they know, are at risk of becoming involved in a criminal operation such as this. Students will also learn about alcohol and the associated risks, as well as the importance of making responsible choices with regards to alcohol.  This unit will continue to build students’ development of our key skill of being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 9 students will learn to evaluate the risks of a range of substances and situations and to suggest and make safe decisions surrounding these.  

Year 10 

Throughout all of their topics in year 10, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by evaluating opinions on contemporary issues and forming their own viewpoints. In year 10, students will consider the ethical issues surrounding some of the topics that they have previously studied such as abortion, and build on their learning through understanding the options available to those who are experiencing fertility difficulties. This will allow students to develop the knowledge and understanding of different medical options that may be available to them or those around them later in life, as well as the range of views that surround these and where they may stem from.  

Year 10 PSHE learning will then continue through the development of understanding of health and wellbeing with a unit focus on keeping healthy. During this, students will develop their understanding of the importance of personal health, the risks of antibiotic resistance, the facts and science relating to immunisation and vaccination and the views around this, such as antivaxxers. As well as this, students will develop an understanding of blood and organ donation and why the NHS has moved to an ‘opt-out’ system regarding this, as well as the importance of self-examination and screening in early identification of health issues. This unit will continue to build students’ development of our key skill of being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 10 students will be able to explain what choices are available to them regarding their health and make decisions based on evidence. Students should also be able to explain how a range of factors could pose risks to physical and mental health and make educated choices based on these.  

Previous learning about careers will be built in in year 10, with students developing an understanding of the importance of equality in the workplace and wider world and the laws surrounding this. Additionally, students will be given the opportunity to create a new vision for their future and think about what things are important to them and how these link to possible future careers. Students will also consider who might be able to help them to achieve their dreams and goals, and how they individually can contribute to their own futures. This unit concludes with students creating a CV to demonstrate their skills and abilities and considering different post-16 options to help to drive their views of the future possibilities.  

During a unit on mental health, students will build on and consolidate their learning of what mental illness is, how to recognise the signs of this, and how to speak sensitively about emotions and mental health concerns. This will then be built on through a study of positivity and the benefits of activities such as exercise, time outdoors and community participation on mental wellbeing and happiness, as well as mindfulness and meditation. Students will also consider what might make someone consider suicide and how we can try to prevent this, such as different local and national services which can be accessed for support.  

Finally in year 10, students will consider the links between money and happiness, and the differences between wealth and poverty. This will help to develop students’ understanding of the world around them and how people can find themselves in different situations in life. Money management and the concepts of income, expenditure, credit and debit, pensions, savings and insurance will also be considered, with students developing the skills and understanding to make financial plans for their own futures. To conclude this unit, students will consider the risks of gambling and how this can be addictive, as well as the implications that doing this may have. This will help to equip students to make responsible choices with regards to money as they progress through life.  

Year 11 

Throughout all of their topics in year 11, students will be developing the skill of developing and sharing their own views and respectfully listening to the views of others, by evaluating opinions on a range of issues and being able to explain their views and the views of others respectfully. In year 11, students will study a unit on politics, law and order. During this unit, students will consider the different forms of government used around the world and evaluate these. Students will also consider how the UK is ruled and how those in power are held to account. Following this, students will learn about how human rights developed over time and why these are important, as well as the role of international law in maintaining peace. Students will also consider the legal system in the UK and how this deals with some problems in society, why some people choose to commit crimes, and what different types of punishment exist, their aims and when different sanctions may be more or less effective.  

During a unit on charities, students will consider what charities are, what they do and the benefits of community participation and voluntary and service-based activities. Students will be given the opportunity to design their own charity, which demonstrates how they could actively participate in improving the community in which they live.   

Year 11 will conclude their PSHE learning through a unit on relationships, which will consolidate and build on the prior learning that students have completed. Students will consider positive relationships, the importance of consent and why this must be free from pressure and the laws surrounding image sharing, to consolidate learning that they have done in prior years. Students will then build on their learning by understanding the concept and risks relating to revenge porn, as well as how the can impact peoples’ lives and the help that is available to the victims of this. Students will again consider the efficacy of different contraceptive options and evaluate these. Students’ learning about relationships will then consider how sex and relationships are shown in the media and in pornography, and how the images represented in these are often distorted. The impact of pregnancy and bringing up a baby will then be considered, with students understanding the different factors that they may wish to consider before choosing to start a family, if this is a desire of theirs. Students learning about sex and relationships education will conclude through a study into recognising abusive relationships and how to get help, the concept and laws surrounding FGM and honour-based violence and killings, and the differences between forced and arranged marriage and  where and how to seek help if they are concerned about these topics. This unit will continue to build students’ development of our key skill of being aware of factors which may be safe or unsafe and being able to make decisions based on this, as in year 11 students will be able to make educated decisions based on a range of evidence regarding their safety. They should be able to lead a healthy and safe life, making independent decisions regarding safety.  

Through tutor time activities, students’ learning of PSHE is consolidated and refined, with all year groups taking part in activities that revisit key messages, such as those about racism, acceptance, and LGBTQ+.  Students also revisit areas of the citizenship curriculum during tutor activities, ensuring that they understand the importance of respecting laws, the justice system, and the role that police play and courts play, as well as the importance of working with others in the community to ensure its improvement and participating in school-based activities. This enables our learners to develop the skills and knowledge that they need to positively participate in the school and the wider world. 

Welcome to the Performing Arts.  Here you will find information about Drama, Dance and Music.

The Arts are central to Mayfield School: it is one of the golden threads running from the infants to the seniors. In Drama, we allow pupils to step outside of their comfort zone, step outside of themselves and learn to be confident, charismatic performers. Teaching pupils to embrace creativity and develop themselves as fully rounded people preparing them for their lives beyond school.  

In the Infants pupils explore Drama through role play, each class has a role play area which allows pupils to engage their creativity in ever changing environments such as bookshops, post offices, and kitchens. Pupils begin to develop their story telling with the use of helicopter stories where they begin to perform vocally, beginning to understand and use prosody in their speech. Pupils build in their role play skills through the Jigsaw PSHE curriculum with specific role play scenarios. Pupils have an opportunity to perform to families in each year of infants to help build their confidence in performing, from year R Nativity to Red Hot Safari and Pirates V’s Mermaids.  

In Juniors the skills learnt in infants are carried forward and developed to encourage a love of the performing. Pupils are encouraged to develop their speaking and listening skills through questioning, clarity of voice and improvisation of answers. Pupils develop their poetry skills through their English learning and perform these poems back to the class, developing their prosody skills. In KS2 pupils begin to learn about script writing and perform these scripts to the class, this gives them the understanding of transferring a script from the page to the stage. Juniors take part in performance opportunities form Matilda the musical to rainforest assemblies to develop their performance skills. 

At Seniors we introduce a broad range of drama to give pupils a good base knowledge and understanding of the world of theatre. We continue to develop the key skills learnt in our primary section, and challenge these further still. Covering the key elements of making, performing and responding to drama, both scripted and devised. All key elements are introduced in our KS3 curriculum to ready pupils for KS4. The development of these skills over time is fundamental to success in drama. Pupils are introduced to a range of issue-based drama which helps them to consider their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development, with a focus on diversity. This is supported with the exploration of the GCSE exam stimuli which cover a range of areas.  

All our work and effort in developing confident and talented performers culminates in the school production, a chance for pupils to tread the boards, stand under the lights and wear the greasepaint – experiencing the intoxicating thrill of a live performance. This could be a musical, like Our House, High School Musical, Into the Woods, or a play from the Shakespeare’s school festival to Brecht. 

All the world is a stage, and we allow our pupils to be front and centre on it. 

Spoken Language 

Pupils should be able to; 

  • listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers 

  • ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge 

  • use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary 

  • articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions 

  • give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes, including for expressing feelings 

  • maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic and initiating and responding to comments 

  • use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas 

  • speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English 

  • participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play/improvisations and debates 

  • gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s) 

  • consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the contributions of others 

  • select and use appropriate registers for effective communication 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-english-programmes-of-study/national-curriculum-in-england-english-programmes-of-study#key-stage-1---year-1 

Spoken English 

Pupils should be able to; 

  • speak confidently and effectively, including through: 

  • using Standard English confidently in a range of formal and informal contexts, including classroom discussion 

  • giving short speeches and presentations, expressing their own ideas and keeping to the point 

  • participating in formal debates and structured discussions, summarising and/or building on what has been said 

  • improvising, rehearsing and performing play scripts and poetry in order to generate languages and discuss language use and meaning, using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-english-programmes-of-study/national-curriculum-in-england-english-programmes-of-study#key-stage-3 

Dance; perform dances using advanced techniques and styles – PE national curriculum.

Spoken Language 

The national curriculum for English reflects the importance of spoken language in pupils’ development across the whole curriculum - cognitively, socially and linguistically. Spoken language continues to underpin the development of pupils’ reading and writing during key stage 4 and teachers should therefore ensure pupils’ confidence and competence in this area continue to develop. Pupils should be taught to understand and use the conventions for discussion and debate, as well as continuing to develop their skills in working collaboratively with their peers to discuss reading, writing and speech across the curriculum.  

Devising Drama 

Learners should; 

work collaboratively to create, develop, perform and evaluate their own piece of devised drama as either performers or designers. 

Learner should know and understand; 

  • research undertaken and how this has informed the development of the drama or design  

  • how to develop an idea to progress from a simple to a more complex stage  

  • how to plan, create and structure drama  

  • how workshops can move the development of the performance forward   

  • how to rehearse in preparation for a performance to an audience 

  • how to make plans for the structure/form of an artefact – set, costume, lighting, sound 

  • how to edit and adapt the work in progress as a result of new ideas or the development of the drama 

  • how to examine in detail the process of creating drama and measure the impact on a live audience 

  • how to communicate meaning to an audience through engaging drama. 

Learners should be able to; 

  • use research to inform creative decisions when devising their drama 

  • examine the social, cultural or historical context of the chosen stimulus 

  • explain how research has impacted on their artistic intentions 

  • show the progression of their idea from initial thoughts to the realised form  

  • select ideas to create engaging drama 

  • clearly document the development of the performance during the devising process through the use of a portfolio  

  • plan for effective use of rehearsals 

  • refine and amend work throughout the devising process so that clear dramatic intentions are communicated to the audience 

  • analyse and evaluate decisions and choices made during the process of creating drama 

  • apply performance or design skills to performance for an audience 

  • explain the changes made to their drama with reference to their artistic intentions and explain the intended impact on the audience 

  • evaluate their final piece of devised drama 

  • use accurate subject specific terminology

Presenting and Performing Texts 

Learners Should; 

  • study two extracts from one performance text 

  • describe their artistic intentions for a performance  

  • present two extracts in a showcase. 

Learners should know and understand; 

  • why the extract is significant in the context of the whole text 

  • the structure of the whole text and the extracts’ place within it  

  • the social, cultural or historical context of the text   

  • the features of the text including:  

  • genre 

  • structure 

  • character  

  • form and style 

  • dialogue  

  • the role of stage directions 

  • how to communicate effectively using: 

  • the semiotics of drama  

  • the skills of a performer or designer  

  • performance conventions  

  • how performance texts can be presented to an audience 

  • the intention of the playwright 

  • theatrical conventions  

  • how to interpret character through voice, movement and language 

  • the use of performance space 

  • the semiotics of theatre as exemplified by the text studied  

  • the relationship between performer and audience  

  • how the different aspects of design impact on the whole creative experience for both performer and audience  

  • the importance of rehearsal including time management and preparation. 

Learner should be able to; 

  • interpret the texts so that the playwright’s intention can be communicated  

  • demonstrate the principles that will underpin their response to the key extracts through performance or design 

  • apply their knowledge of genre, style and theatrical conventions to the way they will perform or design 

  • use performance space effectively 

  • develop a character or design and demonstrate the way it interacts with other characters or with stage artefacts 

  • either: present a complete performance of the extracts with lines learnt, performance rehearsed and refined, performance skills used, intention of the playwright demonstrated and audience engaged 

  • or: present a complete realised design for both extracts with final designs, artefacts, models or sets completed, as appropriate, intention of the playwright demonstrated and audience engaged 

  • use rehearsals effectively to rehearse or make, and to adapt and refine their performance or design as appropriate.

Performance and Response; Written Exam 

Section A 

Learners should;  

Study a whole performance text. 

Learners should know and understand in relation to their performance text:  

  • the contexts of their chosen text including:  

  • social  

  • historical (time set and period written)  

  • cultural  

  • the characteristics of their performance text including:  

  • genres  

  • structure   

  • characters   

  • form and style  

  • theatrical setting (place)   

  • plot and subplot  

  • dialogue  

  • stage directions   

  • how meaning is communicated through:  

  • the use of performance space and spatial relationships on stage  

  • the relationship between performers and audience  

  • the design of: set, props, costume, lighting and sound  

  • an actor’s vocal and physical interpretation of character   

  • the use of performance conventions. 

Learners should be able to; 

  • define how the social, historical and cultural contexts have an effect on the chosen performance text 

  • explore and identify the characteristics of a text through practical preparation work and be able to explain the impact they have on a performance text 

  • select examples from their own practical study which demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the full range of characteristics of the performance text 

  • identify how a range of genres may have been used to inform the characteristics of the performance text  

  • identify how meaning is communicated within the performance text 

  • evaluate the roles that theatre makers (from contemporary professional practice) have on developing, performing and responding to a performance text. 

Learners should in Section A: study the development of drama and performance. 

  • contemporary staging including: 

  • apron  

  • black box  

  • in the round  

  • promenade 

  • proscenium arch 

  • site specific 

  • thrust 

  • traverse 

  • the role of theatre makers in contemporary professional practice, including:  

  • actors 

  • choreographer 

  • costume designer 

  • director 

  • lighting designer 

  • lyricist 

  • playwright 

  • set designer 

  • sound designer 

  • stage managers  

  • understudy 

  • Acting skills including: 

  • blocking  

  • characterisation 

  • improvisation 

  • vocal techniques an actor might use to communicate a role 

  • communication through physicality and the use of body language, facial expression and gesture 

  • the use of semiotics 

  • the design and use of a set including:  

  • composite sets 

  • non-naturalistic sets  

  • the development of character through the creation and use of: 

  • costume 

  • hair and makeup 

  • masks 

Learners should be able to; 

  • evaluate the roles that theatre makers (from contemporary professional practice) have on developing, performing and responding to a performance text 

  • state advantages and disadvantages for the decisions made directing, acting and designing for a performance 

  • apply knowledge and understanding of the development of drama and performance to the studied performance text 

At Mayfield we are incredibly fortunate to be able to offer Dance as a highly valued subject in its own right. In KS1 & KS2 through their PE lessons our students will be introduced to learning and performing a range of movement patterns focusing on developing flexibility, strength, technique, control, and balance. 

 

In year 7,8 and 9 all Mayfield students will have specific dance lessons where they will begin to develop their technique and improve their performance skills. They will learn and perform wide range of dance styles and techniques focusing on developing their understanding and analytical skills when self-evaluating, peer assessing and receiving constant verbal feedback from teachers- they will learn how they need to improve and will begin to apply this to their practical work whilst striving to achieve their personal best. 

 

If a student chooses to carry on with Dance at GCSE level, they will develop their technique and understanding of a range of dance styles further. We focus on embedding a contemporary style within each dancer and a chance to find individual flare that can be applied in choreographic tasks and assessments. We encourage each student to find their style and inspire them to challenge, take risks and find the confidence to lead, choreograph and perform. 

There are 3 practical elements that each student will complete: 

  • Set phrases- 2 x 30 second phrases that are taught and performed to a metronome 

  • Performance in a duet/trio- students will be grouped and taught some of the material for this performance- they will be given a chance to add individual flare and will be directed to make appropriate alterations to the choreography. 

  • Choreography- students will learn the skills required to create their own successful choreography. They will lead a group of students and direct choreographic tasks accordingly in response to a given stimuli. 

There is one written exam focusing on the following areas: 

  • Section A- Knowledge and understanding of choreographic approaches and performing skills.  

  • Section B- Critical appreciation of own work. 

  • Section C- Critical appreciation of professional set works. Here they will study 6 professional work that range in theme, style, mood, and approach. 

PE KS1 NC - perform dances using simple movement patterns 

PE KS2 NC - develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance  

perform dances using a range of movement patterns. 

  • Develop their technique and improve their performance in other competitive sports 

  • Perform dances using advanced dance techniques within a range of dance styles and forms- PE national curriculum. 

analyse their performances compared to previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best 

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills for Choreography 

Action Content 

  • Travel 

  • Turn 

  • Elevation 

  • Gesture 

  • Stillness 

  • Use of different body parts 

  • Floor work 

  • Transfer of weight 

Dynamic Content 

  • Fast/Slow 

  • Sudden/Sustained 

  • Acceleration/Deceleration 

  • Strong/Light 

  • Direct/Indirect 

  • Flowing/Abrupt 

Spatial Content  

  • Pathways 

  • Levels 

  • Directions 

  • Size of Movements 

  • Patterns  

  • Spatial Design 

Relationship Content 

  • Lead and Follow 

  • Mirroring 

  • Action and Reaction  

  • Accumulation 

  • Complement and Contrast 

  • Counterpoint 

  • Contact 

  • Formation  

Choreographic Process 

  • Researching 

  • Improvising 

  • Generating 

  • Selecting  

  • Developing 

  • Structuring 

  • Refining and Synthesising 

Structuring Devices 

  • Binary  

  • Ternary 

  • Rondo 

  • Narrative 

  • Episodic 

  • Beginning/Middle/End 

  • Unity 

  • Logical Sequence  

  • Transition  

Choreographic Devices 

  • Motif and Development  

  • Repetition 

  • Contrast 

  • Highlights 

  • Climax 

  • Manipulation of Number 

  • Unison and Canon 

 

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills for Choreography 

Aural Setting  

  • Song 

  • Instrumental  

  • Orchestral 

  • Spoken Word 

  • Silence 

  • Natural Sound 

  • Found Sound 

  • Body Percussion 

  • Mood and Atmosphere 

  • Contrast and Variety 

  • Structure 

  • Relationship to them/idea 

Performance Environment  

  • Proscenium Arch  

  • End Stage  

  • Site Specific 

  • In the Round 

Communication of Choreographic intent  

  • Mood 

  • Meaning 

  • Theme  

  • Style 

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills for Performance 

Physical Skills  

  • Posture  

  • Alignment 

  • Balance 

  • Coordination  

  • Control 

  • Flexibility 

  • Mobility 

  • Strength 

  • Stamina  

  • Extension  

  • Isolation  

Technical Skills  

Action Content 

E.g. -Travel, Turn, Elevation, Gesture, Stillness, Use of Different Body Parts, Floor Work, Transfer of Weight. 

Dynamic Content 

E.g. – Fast, Slow, Sudden, sustained, acceleration, deceleration, strong, light, direct, indirect, flowing, abrupt.  

Spatial Content 

E.g. – Pathways, Levels, Directions, Size of Movement, Patterns, Spatial Design. 

Relationship Content  

E.g., Lead and Follow, Mirroring, Action and Reaction, Accumulation, Complement and Contrast, Counterpoint, Contact, Formations. 

  • Timing Content 

  • Rhythmic Content 

  • Movement in a stylistic accurate way 

Expressive Skills  

  • Projection 

  • Focus 

  • Spatial Awareness 

  • Facial Expressions 

  • Phrasing 

  • Musicality 

  • Sensitivity to other dancers 

Communication of choreographic intent 

  • Mood 

  • Meaning  

  • Idea 

  • Theme 

  • Style 

Mental Skills  

(During Performance  

  • Movement Memory 

  • Commitment 

  • Concentration 

  • Confidence 

Safe Practice (During Performance) 

  • Safe Execution 

  • Appropriate dance wear (footwear, hair style, absence of jewellery) 

Mental Skills (During Process) 

  • Systematic Repetition 

  • Mental Rehearsal 

  • Rehearsal discipline 

  • Planning of Rehearsal 

  • Response to Feedback 

  • Capacity to improve 

Safe Practice  

(During Process) 

  • Warming Up 

  • Cooling Down  

  • Nutrition 

  • Hydration  

 

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills for Performance; Solo Performance 

Physical Skills  

 

  • Posture  

  • Alignment 

  • Balance 

  • Coordination  

  • Control 

  • Flexibility 

  • Mobility 

  • Strength 

  • Stamina  

  • Extension  

  • Isolation  

 

Technical Skills  

 

Action Content 

E.g. -Travel, Turn, Elevation, Gesture, Stillness, Use of Different Body Parts, Floor Work, Transfer of Weight. 

Dynamic Content 

E.g. – Fast, Slow, Sudden, sustained, acceleration, deceleration, strong, light, direct, indirect, flowing, abrupt.  

Spatial Content 

E.g. – Pathways, Levels, Directions, Size of Movement, Patterns, Spatial Design. 

 

  • Timing Content 

  • Rhythmic Content 

  • Movement in a stylistic accurate way 

 

Expressive Skills  

 

  • Projection 

  • Focus 

  • Spatial Awareness 

  • Facial Expressions 

  • Phrasing 

 

Mental Skills  

(During Performance  

 

  • Movement Memory 

  • Commitment 

  • Concentration 

  • Confidence 

 

Safe Practice (During Performance) 

 

  • Safe Execution 

  • Appropriate dance wear (footwear, hair style, absence of jewellery) 

 

Mental Skills (During Process) 

 

  • Systematic Repetition 

  • Mental Rehearsal 

  • Rehearsal discipline 

  • Planning of Rehearsal 

  • Response to Feedback 

  • Capacity to improve 

 

Safe Practice  

(During Process) 

 

  • Warming Up 

  • Cooling Down  

  • Nutrition 

  • Hydration  

 

Written Paper 

Knowledge and Understanding of Critical Appreciation of OWN WORKS 

Performance  

 

  • The meaning of the relevant performance terminology 

  • The contribution of performance to audience understanding of the choreographic intent of the work being performed including the mood, meaning, idea, theme, and style. 

 

Choreography  

 

  • The meaning of relevant choreography terminology 

  • The contribution of choreography to audience understanding of the choreographic intent of the work including the mood, meaning, idea, theme, and style. 

 

Knowledge and Understanding of Critical Appreciation of SET WORKS 

Features of Production  

 

  • Staging and Set – Projection, furniture, structures, back drop, screens, and features of these such as colour, texture, shape, decoration, materials. 

  • Lighting – Colour, placement, direction, angles. 

  • Costume – (including footwear, masks, make-up, and accessories) Colour, material, texture, flow, shape, line, weight, decoration and how they define character or gender, identify dancers, enhance, or sculpt body and enhance the action. 

  • Dancers – Number/Gender 

  • Aural Setting – Song, instrumental, orchestral, spoken word, silence, natural sound, found sound, body percussion, style, structure, and musical elements such as tone pitch and rhythm. 

  • Dance for Camera – Placement, angle, proximity, special effects.  

 

Performance Environment  

 

  • Proscenium Arch 

  • End Stage  

  • Site Sensitive 

  • In-the-round 

 

Choreographic Approaches 

 

  • Movement content – (ACTION, SPACE, DYNAMICS RELATIONSHIP) as per the knowledge, skills, and understanding for choreography specified in choreography. 

  • Structuring devices and form – Binary, ternary, rondo, narrative, episodic, beginning/middle/end, unity, logical sequence, transitions) 

  • Choreographic devices (motif and development, development, contrast, highlights, climax, manipulation of number, unison, and canon). 

 

Choreographic Intent 

 

  • Mood 

  • Meaning 

  • Idea 

  • Theme 

  • Style/Style fusion 

 

 

The Arts are central to Mayfield School: it is one of the golden threads running from infants to seniors.  Music is a universal language, one that speaks to every individual.  At Mayfield, we give our pupils the opportunity to explore and develop their musical creativity from the earliest stage in the infants through to instrumental exams to show proficiency and advanced skill at seniors.  We know that musical education and appreciation is central to the development of the whole person, as vital as imagination, as reading and writing. 

We will create fully formed musicians, who are comfortable performing, composing and appreciating music in all its forms. 

In Infants, pupils start their musical journey by becoming comfortable using their voices – principally by gathering together for a weekly singing assembly where they explore seasonal songs from traditional harvest festival music, to Christmas carols and modern, contemporary pop music.  They also gain their first experience of instruments; beginning with percussion, including the djembe drums of Africa, through the ukulele and keyboards.  

In Juniors, pupils get the chance to explore music individually – composing, performing and appreciating.  They also get the opportunity to begin instrumental lessons - a range of instruments are available including voice, drums, guitars and keyboards.  They continue to sing weekly as a group and deepen their understanding of instruments they have previously explored.   

Our Primary section gets the opportunity to perform for each other, the school and a wider audience through events such as the nativity, carol concerts and the junior production - as well as celebration assemblies. 

In Seniors, all pupils continue their appreciation of Music in Key Stage 3, developing their skills and knowledge, their ability with instruments and becoming more creative with their compositions and appreciation of the wider forms.  Mayfield also encourages extracurricular expression through singing groups, like choir, to bands and the whole school production.  Even the chance to record and share original and covered content with a wide audience.  Upon reaching Key Stage 4, we offer a BTEC in Music, where participants are able to reach the highest grades. 

Music teaches resilience, the ability to try and not be afraid, because the result will always be something interesting and a learning experience.  In addition, Music is emotive and allows an expression of yourself unlike anything else.  Above all, Music is what life sounds like and is the strongest form of magic. 

Key Stage 1 

Our students use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.  They play tuned and untuned instruments with increasing accuracy, developing musicality and technique.  Students listen with concentration and understanding to a range of live and recorded music evolving their ability to respond aesthetically to music and identifying key musical features.  Students experiment with and create, select and combine sounds using the interrelated dimensions of music to create pieces for desired effects. 

Key Stage 2 

Our students sing and play musically with increasing confidence and control. They develop an understanding of musical composition, organising and manipulating ideas within musical structures and reproducing sounds from a developing aural memory. 

Students play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy and expression.   

They improvise and compose music for a range of purposes and desired effects.  Students listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory.  They use and understand a range of musical notations including staff notation.  Students appreciate and understand a wide range of recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians developing an understanding of the history of music 

Students build on their previous knowledge and skills through performing, composing and listening. They develop their vocal and/or instrumental technique with increasing fluency, accuracy and expressiveness. Students understand musical structures, styles, genres and traditions, identifying the expressive use of musical elements. They listen with increasing discrimination and awareness to inform their practice as musicians. They learn to appreciate and understand a wide range of musical contexts and styles. 

Students play and perform confidently in a range of solo and ensemble contexts using their voice, playing instruments musically, fluently and with accuracy and expression.  We improvise and compose; extending and developing musical ideas by drawing on a range of musical structures, styles, genres and traditions.  use staff and other relevant notations appropriately and accurately in a range of musical styles, genres and traditions.  Students identify and use the Elements of Music expressively and with increasing complexity, including use of tonalities, different types of scales and other musical devices.  They listen with increasing detail to a wide range of music from great composers and musicians understanding its context and history. 

BTEC First Award in Music Levels 1/2 

This qualification is comprised of 4 Units from these 5:- 

1 The Music Industry Exam (1 hour) 

2 Managing a Music Product  

4 Introducing Music Composition (optional) 

5 Introducing Music Performance  

7 Introducing Music Sequencing (optional) 

Unit1 – The Music Industry 

In this Unit we learn about different job roles and organisations that work in the Music Industry.  In addition, we examine how the Music Industry works and how the job roles and organisations relate to each other. 

Unit 2 – Managing a Music Product 

This Unit enables students to manage the planning, delivery and promotion of a live concert.  The students work as a team to plan, stage and perform in the concert.  Each student is usually assigned a role to play in the planning stages individually and as part of a wider team, as well as contributing to meetings and performing in the actual concert.  In addition to this each student is required to take part in the promotion of the concert and an evaluation of the concert to ascertain its successes and areas for improvement after the concert has been staged. 

Unit 4 - Composing 

This Unit offers the chance for students to develop their composing skills.  They develop a portfolio of ideas and develop some of them into completed compositions.  Students will study a range of compositional techniques and produce contrasting musical ideas to develop compositional skills.  Briefs will be used to present students with real life composing challenges.  E.g. Music for an advert or music for a film scene. 

Unit 5 - Performing 

In this Unit, students explore skills and make decisions as they prepare for a performance. Students are taught the importance of planning and rehearsal.  They set themselves medium- and long-term goals and are encouraged to select their own repertoire to practise for their final performances as well as keeping a Practice Log to allow them to monitor their progress. 

Unit 7 – Music Sequencing 

This Unit enables students to create music using a variety of sources, including loops and software instruments.  Students learn how to edit their music using by the application of different processes such as quantisation, looping and note editing, and enhance the the sound by the addition of appropriate plug-in effects such as reverb, delay and distortion.  In addition, they learn how to create a final mix which will become a completed audio file.  

 

Off site  

Motto – Commit to be fit, you’ve got this

Physical Education @ Mayfield gives all students a “shop window” to health, exercise and sport. Physical Education is one of the Golden threads which runs through the school, challenging our student's physical and mental development. Teamwork and respect are key threads that run through all our lessons and our motto focuses on individual improvement and not just excellence. The house system and linked competitions are important in all our lessons and we actively encourage students to be winners. 

Our ethos is to develop key sporting skills in a variety of activities and encourage our enthusiastic students into both extra-curricular and community clubs. These sporting skills are transferable and can be adapted in different situations. We have 4 assessment strands that are used as each child progresses through the school. These include: Health Fitness and Engagement, Application of Skill, Decision Making and Understanding and Leadership, Reflection and Communication. These strands give all students an opportunity to succeed in Physical Education.  

The department has 6 activity pathways which run through the school including Invasion games, Net Games, Striking and Fielding Games, Athletics, Health and Fitness and Swimming. Gymnastics and Dance are also covered in KS2 and KS3. Our provision is based around 2 hours per week of PE with KS1 and KS2 being delivered on site and KS3 and KS4 being delivered at the Mountbatten Centre. This structure improves the quality of provision and experience for all students using the best facilities available. Sports Studies is also offered as an option subject in Years 10 and 11 for those that have an interest in developing their performance and understanding of PE further.  

In PE, we drive to embed the 6 R’s in all lessons. Pupils will need to develop organisation skills to ensure they are ready for practical lessons and after school extra-curricular. We encourage students to be resilient so that push hard to succeed and persevere when the situation is difficult. Students are to show respect to staff and their peers in sporting situations when both winning and losing. The pupils will be able to reflect on their performance and that of their partner to improve performance and succeed. We expect students to develop responsibility as they develop their leadership and communication skills and finally their resourcefulness to transfer their learning from one sport to another. All are important to embed a lifelong appreciation for health and fitness and the enjoyment achieved through participation in competitive sport. 

Physical Education Motto: 

"PE is not about comparing yourself to someone else,  

it's about your desire to be better than you used to be!" 

 

Mayfield the Physical Journey 

Each Student will be assessed against the Core PE Strands as they progress through the school. This is where they can be working towards, achieving the met criteria or extending to depth in each category. 

Strand 1

HFE

Health, Fitness and Engagement

Strand 2

AoS

Application of Skills

Strand 3

DMU

Decision Making and Understanding

Strand 4

LRC

Leadership, Reflection and Communication

Target Sports  

Winter  

Summer  

Extra-Curricular Additions 

KS2 

Gymnastics 

Dance 

Football 

Netball  

Basketball 

Table Tennis 

 

 

Striking and Fielding  

Swimming  

 

Football 

Athletics 

Cricket 

KS3 

Football 

Rugby 

Hockey 

Netball 

 

 

Striking and Fielding 

Athletics  

Tennis  

 

 

Trampolining  

Badminton 

KS4 

Football 

Rugby 

Hockey 

Netball 

 

 

Striking and Fielding 

Athletics  

Tennis 

 

 

 

All Target sports will run alongside a Health Pathway that will run through the schools’ PE Curriculum – This pathway will include activities such as running, outdoor fitness, HRE, circuit training and spinning.  

Staffing  

The delivery of PE across all Key stages to be centrally resourced and staffed. In house training to be completed with non-specialist TA’s to improve quality of delivery.  

Non-Negotiables through Mayfield PE 

Embrace the Department Motto for PE development  

Full KIT for all lessons 

Fully engaged participation with a positive ethos 

Competitive approach to learning to achieve personal goals 

Health mindset – Fit for life! 

Assessment strands to track through the Physical Journey 

PE Skills Progression Grid 

Early Years 

KS1 

KS2 

KS3 

KS4 

H/E Coordination 

Body awareness 

Spatial awareness 

Balance 

 

H/E Coordination 

Body control 

Balance  

Agility 

Working with a Partner 

 

Small Groups 

Running for 15 minutes 

Transfer of basic skills from S to S. 

Teamwork 

Leadership 

Consistency 

Accuracy 

Decision Making 

Alternative responses to situations 

Develop Tactics 

Anticipation 

Deception 

Reflection and Improvement  

 

 

 

Primary - Statutory Curriculum 

Development of basic fine and gross motor skills, spatial awareness and working with others.   

Development of key skills including: 

•Co-ordination  

•Agility  

•Balance  

•Reaction Time   

•Co-operation and Team work 

EYFS – Continuous provision has a strong emphasis on physical development and the outdoor space can be accessed by pupils at all times. Real PE is introduced and taught in explicit sessions alongside the ABC programme. These can be delivered as a class or as an intervention for targeted groups. 

KS 1 - 2 hours per week – one indoor Real PE session and one outdoor games lesson are  

taught by the class or PPA teacher. The ABC programme is taught as an intervention for targeted children. 

Primary - Statutory Curriculum 

Development of basic fine and gross motor skills, spatial awareness and working with others.   

Development of key skills including: 

  • Co-ordination  
  • Agility  
  • Balance  
  • Reaction Time   
  • Co-operation and Teamwork 

EYFS – Continuous provision has a strong emphasis on physical development and the outdoor space can be accessed by pupils at all times. Real PE is introduced and taught in explicit sessions alongside the ABC programme. These can be delivered as a class or as an intervention for targeted groups. 

KS 1 - 2 hours per week – one indoor Real PE session and one outdoor games lesson are taught by the class or PPA teacher. The ABC programme is taught as an intervention for targeted children. 

Pupils should develop fundamental movement skills, become increasingly competent and confident and access a broad range of opportunities to extend their agility, balance and coordination, individually and with others. They should be able to engage in competitive (both against self and against others) and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly challenging situations. 

  • Master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities 

  • Participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending  

  • Perform dances using simple movement patterns. 

Year 1 Games 

Year 2 Games 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Throw underarm 

  • Hit a ball underarm 

  • Move and stop safely 

  • Throw and catch with both hand 

  • Throw and kick in different ways.  

  

Children could be taught to; 

  • Use hitting/ kicking and/or rolling in a game 

  • Decide the best space to use in a game 

  • Use a tactic in a game 

  • Follow rules 

  

  

Year 1 Gymnastics 

Year 2 Gymnastics 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Make their body curled, tensed, stretched and relaxed. 

  • Control their body when travelling and balancing. 

  • Copy sequences and repeat them.  

  • Roll, curl, travel and balance in different ways.  

 

Children could be taught to; 

  •  Plan and perform a sequence of movements. 

  • Improve their sequence based on feedback.  

  • Think of more than one way to create a sequence which follow some ‘rules’. 

  • Work on their own and with a partner. 

Year 1 Dance 

Year 2 Dance 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Move to music. 

  • Copy dance moves. 

  • Perform their own dance moves. 

  • Make up a short dance. 

  • Move safely in a space. 

  

Children could be taught to; 

  • Change rhythm, speed, level and direction in my dance. 

  • Dance with control and coordination. 

  • Make a sequence by linking sections together. 

  

Year 1 Athletics 

Year 2 Athletics 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Explore different ways to run - adjust speed 

  • Throw, aim and catch large missiles 

  • Jump using one and two feet. Land safely. 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Vary the speed of running 

  • Throw, aim and catch missiles with increasing accuracy 

  • Jump in different ways and land safely. 

 

  

Year 1 General 

Year 2 General 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Copy actions. 

  • Repeat actions and skills. 

  • Move with control and care. 

  • Use equipment carefully. 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Copy and remember actions. 

  • Talk about what is different from what and did and what someone else did. 

 

KS2 – Skill Development building on that learned in KS1 and the introduction of Target Sport Development. 

1 hour per week – PE lesson  

1 hour per week – Games Lesson  

KS 2 pupils all have access to one unit of swimming. 

Specialist Staff work alongside the class teacher to deliver high quality subject knowledge.  Real PE is used as a basis for lessons. 

All pupils have an opportunity to compete in at least one event per year as part of the Portsmouth Schools Programme. 

Additional opportunities are provided to all pupils to participate in additional sporting activities as part of the extensive extra-curricular programme. 

Pupils should continue to apply and develop a broader range of skills, learning how to use them in different ways and to link them to make actions and sequences of movement. They should enjoy communicating, collaborating and competing with each other. They should develop an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports and learn how to evaluate and recognise their own success. 

 

  • Use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination  

  • Play competitive games, modified where appropriate [for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis], and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending  

  • Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance [for example, through athletics and gymnastics]  

  • Perform dances using a range of movement patterns  

  • Take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team  

  • Compare their performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best. 

Swimming and water safety 

  • Swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25 metres  

  • Use a range of strokes effectively [for example, front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke]  

  • Perform safe self-rescue in different water-based situations 

Year 3 Games 

Year 4 Games 

Children could be taught to; 

  •  Throw and catch with control 

  • Be aware of space and use it to support team mates and to cause problems for the opposition 

  • Know and use the rules fairly 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Catch with one hand 

  • Throw and catch accurately 

  • Hit a ball accurately and with control 

  • Keep possession of a ball 

  • Vary tactics and adapt skills depending on what is happening in a game 

 

Year 3 Gymnastics 

Year 4 Gymnastics 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Adapt sequences to suit different types of apparatus and criteria. 

  • Explain how strength and suppleness affect performance. 

  • Compare and contrast gymnastic sequences. 

  

Children could be taught to; 

  • Work in a controlled way 

  • Include a change of speed and direction 

  • Include a range of shapes 

  • Work with a partner to create, repeat and improve a sequence with at least 3 phases 

Year 3 Dance 

Year 4 Dance 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Improvise freely and translate ideas from a stimulus into movement. 

  • Share and create phrases with a partner and small group. 

  • Repeat, remember and perform phrases. 

 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Take the lead when working with a partner or group. 

  • Use dance to communicate an idea. 

Year 3 Athletics 

Year 4 Athletics 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Run at fast, medium and slow speeds. 

  • Take part in a relay, remembering when to run and what to do. 

  • Throw with increasing accuracy 

  • Jump in different ways 

  

  

Children could be taught to; 

  • Run over a long distance 

  • Sprint over a short distance 

  • Throw in different ways 

  • Hit a target 

  • Jump in different ways and with increasing control 

  

Year 3 Outdoor & Adventurous 

Year 4 Outdoor & Adventurous 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Follow a map in a familiar context. 

  • Use clues to follow a route 

  • Follow a route safely  

Children could be taught to; 

  • Follow a map in a (more demanding) familiar context. 

  • Follow a route with time limit 

  

 

Year 5 Games 

Year 6 Games 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Gain possession by working as a team 

  • Pass in different ways 

  • Use forehand and backhand with a racquet 

  • Field in different sports 

  • Choose a tactic for defending and attacking 

  • Use several techniques to pass, dribble and shoot 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Play to the agreed rules 

  • Explain rules to others 

  • Umpire 

  • Make a team and communicate a plan 

  • Lead others in a game situation 

Year 5 Gymnastics 

Year 6 Gymnastics 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Make complex extended sequences 

  

  

Children could be taught to; 

  • Combine their own work with that of others. 

  • Make sequences to specific timetables.  

Year 5 Dance 

Year 6 Dance 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Compose my own dances in a creative way. 

  • Perform to an accompaniment. 

  • Make a dance that shows clarify, fluency, accuracy and consistency. 

  

Children could be taught to; 

  • Develop sequences in a specific style. 

  • Choose my own music and style. 

Year 5 Athletics 

Year 6 Athletics 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Throw with accuracy. 

  • Complete a controlled take-off and landing. 

  • Begin to combine running and jumping. 

  

Children could be taught to; 

  • Demonstrate stamina. 

  • Throw with accuracy and precision. 

  • Complete a controlled take-off and landing. 

  • Combine running and jumping with increasing control. 

 

Year 5 Outdoor & Adventurous 

Year 6 Outdoor & Adventurous 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Follow a map in an unknown location 

  • Use clues and a compass to navigate a route 

  • Change my route to overcome a problem.  

  • Use new information to change my route.  

 

Children could be taught to; 

  • Plan a route and a series of clues for someone else. 

  • Plan with others, taking account of safety and danger. 

The KS3 delivery of Physical Education will be conducted through an offsite programme at the Mountbatten centre. Units of study are followed for a Half term and then rotated on a carousel. 

Invasion Games  

Striking and Fielding  

Net Games  

Football  

Rugby 

Netball  

Hockey  

Basketball  

Handball 

Cricket 

Softball  

Rounders 

Stoolball 

Tennis 

Badminton 

Table Tennis  

Health 

Athletics  

Swimming 

Running 

HRE 

Spinning  

Track  

Field  

Safety 

Stroke Development 

Life Saving 

 

KS3 Example 

Health 

Swimming 

Net Games 

Invasion Games 

Invasion Games  

Health 

Swimming 

Net Games 

Net Games 

Invasion Games 

Health 

Swimming 

Swimming 

Net Games 

Invasion Games 

Health 

Athletics 

Athletics  

Striking and Fielding 

Striking and Fielding 

Striking and Fielding 

Striking and Fielding 

Track  

Track 

 

Assessed through the 4 PE strands for Years 7-9: 

  1. Health, fitness and engagement  

  1. Application of skill 

  1. Decision Making and Understanding 

  1. Leadership, reflection and communication 

Students are actively encouraged to enhance their sporting interests through extra-curricular sport and links with community clubs. In KS3, students will also complete the bleep test at least once per half term to demonstrate their level of fitness.  

Linked to National Curriculum 

  • Develop tactics and strategies to overcome opponents in both team and individual sports. 

  • Develop their technique and improve their performance. 

  • Take on physical challenges and work in a team to solve problems. 

  • Analyse their performances and demonstrate improvement. 

  • Take part in competitive sports through community links or sports clubs. 

The KS4 delivery of Physical Education will be conducted through an offsite programme at the Mountbatten centre. Units of study are followed for a Half term and then rotated on a carousel. 

Year 10 

Health 

Swimming 

Games 

Gym 

Gym 

Health 

Swimming 

Games 

Games 

Gym 

Health 

Swimming 

Swimming 

Games 

Gym  

Health 

Track 

Track 

Striking and Fielding 

Striking and Fielding 

Striking and Fielding 

Striking and Fielding 

Track  

Track 

 

Year 11 

Health 

Gym 

Games 

Tennis 

Tennis 

Health 

Gym 

Games 

Games 

Tennis 

Health 

Gym 

Gym 

Games 

Tennis 

Health 

Track 

Track 

Striking and Fielding 

Striking and Fielding 

Striking and Fielding 

Striking and Fielding 

Track  

Track 

 

The practical lessons are choice based with students opting towards an activity. These practical sessions are used to extend their development and give them a healthy balance in their education. It is also to embed a healthy ethos and a lifelong love of sport and exercise. Students are actively encouraged to enhance their sporting interests through extra-curricular sport and links with community clubs. 

Option Course – Sports Studies 

Cambridge National Units 

Course Description: 

On this course, students will complete three coursework units and one exam.  

  • Unit 1 – Contemporary Issues in Sport (Exam 1 Hour)  

  • Unit 2 – Practical Sport (Physical Assessment) 

  • Unit 3 – Sports Leadership 

  • Unit 4 – Sport and the Media 

This option carries a 50% theory and practical lesson breakdown where all students are expected to extend their interest in sports in outside clubs and teams. 

Topics for Study:  

  • Contemporary issues in sport – Sporting behaviour, performance enhancing drugs, hosting national sporting events and governing bodies.  

  • Practical Sport – Skills, tactics and performance in both an individual and team activity. Officiate effectively and identify how to improve performance.  

  • Sports leadership – Qualities of sports leaders, plan, deliver and evaluate a safe sporting activity. Awareness of equipment, facilities and structure.    

  • Sport and the media – Types, positive and negative impacts on performers and sport. 

Each delivered unit will have 4/5 Learning Outcomes with a total mark available of 60. The Unit is marked progressively so every mark counts towards their total (Max 240). Students are required to apply their knowledge and experience to each task linking to their own practical examples. Students are introduced to each task by the teacher and then can research the area further to deepen their understanding using the internet. 

Here you will find information about Computing and Business Studies.

“The only way to great work is to love what you do.”  

Steve Jobs 

At Mayfield, we understand the importance of Computing and the doors that this subject can open. With this in mind, the curriculum is designed to allow students, to explore potential career pathways. Students are taught a range of skills so that when they come to need a specific key for a specific job, they are equipped with it. Whether it’s a video editor, programmer, network manager or anything else in the industry, the Mayfield Computing curriculum is deliberately designed to cover as many areas of the industry as possible whilst teaching students transferrable life skills which they will continue to develop as they go through the school. We aim to prepare students to become productive, responsible, ethical, creative and compassionate members of the digital world. One key belief of Computing at Mayfield, is the principle of allowing the students to try something new and to make their own mistakes and learn from them.  

 

"It’s fine to celebrate success but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure." 

Bill Gates 

Our goal in Business Studies is to equip our young people with the skills, knowledge, resilience and mindset to thrive in the world of business and make a change for the better. Students can gain a range of skills by engaging in our excellent Enterprise opportunities through their time at Mayfield. 

In an ever-changing political world, the study of Business and how businesses are set up, grow and change has never been more important post-pandemic. The way in which businesses of today make, spend, save and use money to trade is critical for moving our local, national and international economy forward. We aim to teach our students about ethics, laws, finances and marketing, with real world case studies and deep rich questions, that allow for a growth mindset. We explore wider Business issues both home and abroad, such as impact of import and exports trade and companies relocating to other countries. Students have the opportunity in Year R-10 to take part in Business enterprise competitions to allow for more practical skills to be developed and prepare themselves for the world of work and post 16 opportunities.  

KS4 Qualification Syllabus AQA Business 

 

Content 

3.1 Business in the real world 

3.1.1 The purpose and nature of businesses 

Purpose of business 

 

  • Reasons for starting a business 

  • Basic functions and types of business 

  • Business enterprise and entrepreneurship 

  • Dynamic nature of business 

3.1.2 Business ownership 

  • Sole traders 

  • Partnerships 

  • Private limited companies (ltd) 

  • Public limited companies (plc) 

  • Not-for-profit organisations 

3.1.3  Setting business aims and objectives 

• What are business aims and objectives 

• Purpose of setting objectives 

• Role of objectives in running a business 

• Changing objectives 

• Use of objectives in judging success 

3.1.4  Stakeholders 

• Main stakeholders of businesses 

• Objectives of stakeholders 

• Impact of business activity on  

stakeholders 

• Impact and influence stakeholders have  

on businesses 

3.1.5  Business location 

Factors influencing the location decision of  

a business 

3.1.6  Business planning 

• The purpose of business planning 

• The main sections within a business  

plan 

• Basic financial terms 

• Basic financial calculations 

3.1.7  Expanding a business 

Methods of expansion 

• Benefits and drawbacks of expansion 

• Economies of scale 

• Diseconomies of scale 

3.2 Influences on business 

3.2.1  Technology 

• E-commerce 

• Digital communication 

3.2.3  The economic climate on businesses 

• Interest rates: 

• how fluctuating interest rates can  

affect businesses that rely on  

overdrafts and loans for finance 

• how fluctuating interest rates can  

affect consumer and business  

spending. 

• Level of employment 

• Consumer spending 

3.2.4  Globalisation 

How UK businesses compete  

internationally, offering: 

• better designs 

• higher quality products at lower prices. 

Exchange rates 

3.2.5  Legislation 

• Employment law 

• Health and Safety law 

• Consumer law 

3.2.6  Competitive environment 

• Impact on businesses of operating in  

competitive markets 

• Uncertainty and risks businesses face 

3.3 Business operations 

3.3.1  Production processes 

Methods of production: 

• job 

• flow. 

Efficiency in production: 

• lean production 

• just in time (JIT). 

3.3.2  The role of procurement 

Managing stock: 

• Just in time (JIT) 

• Just in case (JIC). 

Factors affecting choice of suppliers  

including: 

• price 

• quality 

• reliability. 

3.3.3  The concept of quality 

Consequences of quality issues 

Methods of maintaining consistent quality:  

Total quality management (TQM) 

Costs and benefits of maintaining quality: 

• additional sales 

• image/reputation 

• higher price 

• inspection costs 

• staff training 

• product recalls 

• the provision of services. 

3.3.4  Good customer services 

Methods of good service: 

• product knowledge 

• customer engagement (creating a  

positive experience for the customer) 

• post sales services (eg user training,  

help lines, servicing). 

Benefits of good customer service,  

including: 

• increase in customer satisfaction 

• customer loyalty 

• increased spend 

• profitability. 

Dangers of poor customer service,  

including: 

• dissatisfied customers 

• poor reputation via word of mouth 

• reduction in revenue. 

The ways in which advances in ICT have  

allowed customer services to develop: 

• websites 

• e-commerce 

• social media. 

3.4 Human resources 

3.4.1  Organisational structures 

• Organisational structures 

• Appropriateness of organisational  

structures 

• Centralisation and decentralisation 

3.4.2  Recruitment and selection of employees 

• The need for recruitment 

• Methods of recruitment and selection of  

employees